Etymology
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conservatism (n.)

1835, "political principles and opinions of the Conservative party in British politics;" from conservative + -ism. From 1838 in reference to conservative principles generally, "disposition to maintain and adhere to the established order of things, wariness of innovation or change."

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Olaf 
masc. proper name, from Old Norse An-leifr, literally "ancestor's relic;" first element related to Old High German ano "ancestor;" second element related to Old English læfan "to leave" (from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere").
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coherent (adj.)

1550s, "harmonious;" 1570s, "sticking together," also "connected, consistent" (of speech, thought, etc.), from French cohérent (16c.), from Latin cohaerentem (nominative cohaerens), present participle of cohaerere "cohere," from assimilated form of com "together" (see co-) + haerere "to adhere, stick" (see hesitation).

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hesitation (n.)

c. 1400, from Old French hesitacion or directly from Latin haesitationem (nominative haesitatio) "a hesitation, stammering," figuratively "irresolution, uncertainty," noun of action from past participle stem of haesitare "stick fast, remain fixed; stammer in speech," figuratively "hesitate, be irresolute, be at a loss, be undecided," frequentative of haerere (past participle haesus, first person perfect indicative haesi) "to adhere, stick, cling."

This is said by Watkins to be from PIE root *ghais- "to adhere, hesitate" (source also of Lithuanian gaišti "to delay, tarry, be slow"), but some linguists reject the proposed connection; de Vaan offers no etymology.

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agglutinative (adj.)
"having the power or tendency to unite or adhere," 1630s, originally in a medical sense, from Latin agglutinat-, past participle stem of agglutinare "stick on, fasten with glue," from ad "to" (see ad-) + glutinare "to glue," from gluten "glue," from PIE *glei- "clay," also forming words with a sense of "to stick together" (see clay). Philological sense is from 1650s.
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conglutinate (v.)

early 15c., "to fasten together," also, of a broken bone or wound, "to heal, close up," from Latin conglutinatus, past participle of conglutinare, from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + glutinare "to glue," from gluten "glue," from PIE *glei- "clay," also forming words with a sense of "to stick together" (see clay). Intransitive sense of "to adhere" is from 1620s. Related: Conglutinated; conglutinating; conglutination.

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cohesive (adj.)

"of or causing the quality of adhering together; capable of sticking," 1730, with -ive + Latin cohaes-, past participle stem of cohaerere "to cleave together," in transferred use, "be coherent or consistent," from assimilated form of com "together" (see co-) + haerere "to adhere, stick" (see hesitation). Related: Cohesively; cohesiveness.

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liparo- 
before vowels lipar-, word-forming element meaning "oily," from Greek liparos "oily, shiny with oil, fatty, greasy," used of rich soil and smooth skin; figuratively "rich, comfortable; costly, splendid," from lipos "fat" (from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere," also used to form words for "fat").
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cohere (v.)

1590s, "to be consistent, to follow regularly in natural or logical order," from Latin cohaerere "to cleave together," in transferred use, "be coherent or consistent," from assimilated form of com "together" (see co-) + haerere "to adhere, stick" (see hesitation). More literal sense of "to stick, stick together, cleave" is from 1610s. Related: Cohered; cohering.

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leave (v.)

Old English læfan "to allow to remain in the same state or condition; to let remain, allow to survive; to have left (of a deceased person, in reference to heirs, etc.); to bequeath (a heritage)," from Proto-Germanic *laibjanan (source also of Old Frisian leva "to leave," Old Saxon farlebid "left over"), causative of *liban "remain" (source of Old English belifan, German bleiben, Gothic bileiban "to remain"), from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere."

The Germanic root seems to have had only the sense "remain, continue" (which was in Old English as well but has since become obsolete), which also is in Greek lipares "persevering, importunate." But this usually is regarded as a development from the primary PIE sense of "adhere, be sticky" (compare Lithuanian lipti, Old Church Slavonic lipet "to adhere," Greek lipos "grease," Sanskrit rip-/lip- "to smear, adhere to."

Originally a strong verb (past participle lifen), it early switched to a weak form. Meaning "go away, take one's departure, depart from; leave behind" (c. 1200) comes from notion of "leave behind" (as in to leave the earth "to die;" to leave the field "retreat"). From c. 1200 as "to stop, cease; give up, relinquish, abstain from having to do with; discontinue, come to an end;" also "to omit, neglect; to abandon, forsake, desert; divorce;" also "allow (someone) to go."

Colloquial use for "let, allow" is by 1840, said by OED to be chiefly American English. Not related to leave (n.). To leave out "omit" is from late 15c. To leave (something) alone is from c. 1400; to leave (something) be is from 1825. To leave (something/nothing) to be desired is from 1780. To leave it at that is from 1902. Leave off is from c. 1400 as "cease, desist" (transitive); early 15c. as "stop, make an end" (intransitive).

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