Etymology
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mantissa (n.)

"decimal part of a logarithm," 1865, from Latin mantisa "a worthless addition, makeweight," perhaps a Gaulish word introduced into Latin via Etruscan (compare Old Irish meit, Welsh maint "size"). So called as being "additional" to the characteristic or integral part. The Latin word was used in 17c. English in the sense of "an addition of small importance to a literary work, etc."

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appendix (n.)
1540s, "subjoined addition to a document or book," from Latin appendix "an addition, continuation, something attached," from appendere "cause to hang (from something)," from ad "to" (see ad-) + pendere "to hang" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). Used for "small outgrowth of an internal organ" from 1610s, especially in reference to the vermiform appendix. This sense in English is perhaps from or influenced by French appendix, where the term was in use in anatomy from 1540s.
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broke (adj.)
from obsolete past participle of break (v.); extension to "insolvent" is first recorded 1716 (broken in this sense is attested from 1590s). Old English cognate broc meant, in addition to "that which breaks," "affliction, misery."
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sur- (1)
word-forming element meaning "over, above, beyond, in addition," especially in words from Anglo-French and Old French, from Old French sour-, sor-, sur-, from Latin super "above, over," from PIE root *uper "over."
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appositive (adj.)
1690s, "applicable," from Latin apposit-, past participle stem of apponere "set near, set before; apply, give in addition; appoint, designate" (see apposite) + -ive. As a noun in grammar, "words in apposition," from 1847.
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tot (v.)
"to reckon up," 1760, from tot (n.) "total of an addition," first recorded 1680s, short for total (n.). Hence, "to mark (an account or a name) with the word 'tot.'"
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anticlimax (n.)
"the addition of a particular which suddenly lowers the effect," especially, in style, "an abrupt descent from a stronger to a weaker expression or from greater to lesser things," 1701, from anti- + climax (n.).
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besides (prep.)
attested from c. 1200, common after c. 1400, from beside (q.v.) + adverbial genitive -s. Once sharing all the senses of beside, now properly limited to the adverbial sense "in addition to, otherwise."
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extra-curricular (adj.)

also extracurricular, in reference to education, "pursued in addition to the normal course of study," 1911, from extra- + curricular. As a noun, "an extra-curricular course or activity," by 1957.

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epexegesis (n.)
"words added to convey more clearly the meaning intended," 1620s, from Modern Latin, from Greek epexegesis "a detailed account, explanation," from epi "in addition" (see epi-) + exegeisthai "to explain" (see exegesis). Related: Epexegetic; epexegetical.
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