Etymology
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cover-up (n.)

also coverup, "means or act of concealing" some event or activity, 1922, from the verbal phrase (1872), from cover (v.) + up (adv.).

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pop-up (n.)
from 1906 as a type of baseball hit; from pop (v.) + up (adv.). As an adjective from 1934 (of a children's book, later toasters, etc.).
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shut up (v.)

c. 1400, "keep from view or use," from shut (v.) + up (adv.). Meaning "cause to stop talking" is from 1814; intransitive meaning "cease from speaking" is from 1840. Put up or shut up "defend yourself or be silent" is U.S. slang, by 1868.

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up-country (n.)
"interior regions," 1680s, from up- + country (n.). As an adjective from 1810; as an adverb from 1864.
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write-up (n.)
1882, from the verbal phrase; see write (v.) + up (adv.).
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link-up (n.)

"a joining together or coupling," 1945, from the verbal phrase; see link (v.) + up (adv.).

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mark-up (n.)

also markup, "amount added by a retailer to cover overhead and provide profit," 1899, from the verbal phrase in this sense (by 1870); see mark (v.) + up (adv.).

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grow up (v.)
"advance toward maturity," 1530s, from grow (v.) + up (adv.). As a command to be sensible, from 1951.
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hang up (v.)
c. 1300, "suspend (something) so that it is supported only from above;" see hang (v.) + up (adv.); telephone sense by 1911. The noun hang-up "psychological fixation" is first attested 1959, from notion of being suspended in one place.
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sign-up (n.)
"number who have signed up," 1926, from the verbal phrase; see sign (v.) + up (adv.).
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