Etymology
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acidulate (v.)
"make somewhat sour, flavor with an acid," 1704 (implied in acidulated), from Latin acidulus "slightly sour" (see acidulous) + -ate (2). Related: Acidulating; acidulent.
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glutamate (n.)
salt of glutamic acid, 1876, from glutamic acid (see gluten) + -ate (3).
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nitric (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, or derived from nitre," 1794, originally in reference to acid obtained initially from distillation of saltpeter; see nitre + -ic. Perhaps immediately from French nitrique. The acid was known as aqua fortis, later acid spirit of nitre, then nitric acid (1787) under the system ordered by Lavoisier.

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deoxyribonucleic (n.)

1931, in deoxyribonucleic acid (originally desoxyribonucleic), a nucleic acid which yields deoxyribose on hydrolysis, from deoxyribose (q.v.) + nucleic acid (see nucleic). It is generally found in chromosomes of higher organisms and stores genetic information.

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carbonate (n.)
"compound formed by the union of carbonic acid with a base," 1794, from French carbonate "salt of carbonic acid" (Lavoisier), from Modern Latin carbonatem "a carbonated (substance)," from Latin carbo (see carbon).
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thymine (n.)
nitrogenous base, 1894, from German (Kossel and Neumann, 1893), from thymic acid, from which it was isolated, the acid so called because obtained from the thymus gland. With chemical suffix -ine (2).
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RNA (n.)
1948, abbreviation of ribonucleic acid (see ribonucleic).
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carbonation (n.)
"act or process of causing combination with carbonic acid," 1869, from carbonic acid, an old name for carbon dioxide (q.v.), + -ation. Probably immediately from French carbonation (1856).
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sulfite (n.)
salt of sulfurous acid, 1790, from sulfur + -ite (2).
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LSD 
"lysergic acid diethylamide," 1950 (as LSD 25), from German LSD (1947), from letters in Lysergsäure-diäthylamid, the German form of the chemical name. For first element, see lysergic. German säure "acid" is cognate with English sour (adj.).
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