Etymology
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misstatement (n.)

"a wrong statement, an erroneous account or relation," 1783, from misstate + -ment or else from mis- + statement.

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narrative (n.)

"a tale, a story, a connected account of the particulars of an event or series of incidents," 1560s, from French narrative and from narrative (adj.).

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comptroller (n.)

c. 1500, a variant of controller, with bad spelling due to influence of unrelated French compte "an account," from Latin computare.

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I.R.A. (2)

also IRA, initialism (acronym) for individual retirement account, attested from 1974.

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misrepresentation (n.)

"unfair or dishonest account," 1640s, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + representation.

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tally (v.)

mid-15c., "keep an account by tally," from Medieval Latin talliare "to tax," from tallia (see tally (n.)). Meaning "correspond, agree" is from 1705; sports sense of "to score" is from 1867. Related: Tallied; tallying. Hence tally-sheet (1889); tallyman "one who keeps account (of anything)" (1857).

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red ink (n.)

"financial losses, the debit side of an account," 1929, from the red ink traditionally used to indicate debits in accounts. Earlier, "cheap wine" (1919).

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nonetheless 

"not the more or not the less on that account," 1839, none the less; contracted into one word by c. 1930.

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impute (v.)

early 15c., from Old French imputer, emputer (14c.) and directly from Latin imputare "to reckon, make account of, charge, ascribe," from assimilated form of in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + putare "to trim, prune; reckon, clear up, settle (an account)," from PIE *puto- "cut, struck," suffixed form of root *pau- (2) "to cut, strike, stamp." Related: Imputed; imputing.

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bookkeeper (n.)

also book-keeper, "person who keeps accounts, one whose occupation is to make a formal balanced record of pecuniary transactions in account-books," 1550s, from book (n.) + keeper. A rare English word with three consecutive double letters. Another is bookkeeping, attested from 1680s in the sense of "the work of keeping account books;" book-keep (v.) is a back-formation from 1886.

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