Etymology
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disunity (n.)

"want of unity, state of separation; absence of accord," 1630s, from dis- + unity.

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absent (prep.)
Origin and meaning of absent
"in the absence of," 1944, principally from U.S. legal use, from absent (adj.).
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cleanness (n.)
Old English clænnes "(moral) cleanness, purity, chastity;" see clean (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "absence of dirt or filth" is late 14c.
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disorganization 

"disruption or destruction of order, a breaking up of order or system, absence of orderly arrangement," 1790, noun of action or state from disorganize.

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disequilibrium (n.)

"absence or destruction of equilibrium," 1840; see dis- + equilibrium. Specific sense in economics is by 1927.

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sameness (n.)

1580s, "oneness, unity, absence or negation of otherness," from same + -ness. From 1743 (Walpole's letters) as "want of variety, monotony."

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furlough (v.)

1783, "grant leave of absence" (to a soldier), from furlough (n.). Of employees, "lay off or suspend temporarily," by 1940. Related: Furloughed; furloughing.

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destitution (n.)

early 15c., destitucioun, "deprivation, loss, absence of something desired," from Old French destitution and directly from Latin destitutionem (nominative destitutio) "a forsaking, deserting," from destitutus, past participle of destituere "forsake," from de "away" (see de-) + statuere "put, place," causative of stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Meaning "absence of means or resources, indigence, poverty" is from c. 1600.

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non-existence (n.)

also nonexistence, "absence of existence, the condition of not existing," 1640s; see non- + existence. Middle English in this sense had non-being (mid-15c.).

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naturalness (n.)

early 15c., "normality," from natural (adj.) + -ness. From 1650s as "state of being natural," also "conformity to nature; absence of artificiality, exaggeration, or affectation."

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