Etymology
Advertisement
mollusk (n.)

"soft-bodied invertebrate animal, usually with an external shell," 1783, mollusque (modern spelling from 1839), from French mollusque, from Modern Latin Mollusca (see Mollusca), the phylum name. Related: Molluscuous; molluscan.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sea-dog (n.)

1590s, "harbor seal," from sea + dog (n.). Also "pirate" (1650s). Meaning "old seaman, sailor who has been long afloat" is attested by 1823. In Middle English sea-hound was used of the walrus and the beaver.

Related entries & more 
understandable (adj.)
late 14c., "able to understand;" late 15c., "able to be understood," from understand + -able. Related: Understandably.
Related entries & more 
endurable (adj.)
c. 1600, "able to endure," from endure + -able, or from French endurable. Meaning "able to be endured" is from 1744. Related: Endurably.
Related entries & more 
catchable (adj.)

"able to be caught," 1690s, from catch (v.) + -able.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
scalable (adj.)

1570s, "able to be climbed;" see scale (v.1) + -able. By 1936 as "able to be graded by scale." Related: Scalably; scalability.

Related entries & more 
describable (adj.)

"able to be described, capable of description," 1670s; see describe + -able.

Related entries & more 
Jock 
c. 1500, variant of the masc. proper name Jack, the by-form of John. In Scotland and northern England it is the usual form. Since 1520s, like Jack, it has been used generically, as a common appellative of lads and servants, as the name of a typical man of the common folk, of a Scottish or North Country seaman, etc.
Related entries & more 
capable (adj.)

"sufficiently able, having power or capacity, qualified," 1590s, from French capable "able, sufficient; able to hold," or directly from Late Latin capabilis "receptive; able to grasp or hold," used by theologians, from Latin capax "able to hold much, broad, wide, roomy;" also "receptive, fit for;" adjectival form of capere "to grasp, lay hold, take, catch; undertake; take in, hold; be large enough for; comprehend" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp"). Other late 16c. senses in English, now obsolete, were "able to comprehend; able to contain; extensive." Related: Capably.

Related entries & more 
Columbus 

his name is Latinized from his native Italian Cristoforo Colombo, in Spanish Cristóbal Colón.

America was discovered accidentally by a great seaman who was looking for something else, and most of the exploration for the next fifty years was done in the hope of getting through or around it. [S.E. Morison, "The Oxford History of the United States," 1965]
Related entries & more 

Page 2