Etymology
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versatility (n.)
1755, "fickleness," from versatile + -ity. As "ability to do many things well" from 1798.
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decompensate (v.)

"lose the ability to maintain compensation," 1912, probably a back-formation from decompensation. Related: Decompensated; decompensating.

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parts (n.)

"personal qualities, gifts of ability, share of mental endowments or acquirements," 1560s, from part (n.).

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literacy (n.)
"ability to read and write," 1883, from literate + abstract noun suffix -cy. Illiteracy, however, dates back to 17c.
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Fergus 
masc. proper name, from Gaelic Fearghus or Old Irish Fergus "man-ability," first element cognate with Latin vir "man" (from PIE root *wi-ro- "man"); second from Old Irish gus "ability, excellence, strength, inclination," from Celtic root *gustu- "choice," from PIE root *geus- "to taste; to choose."
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empath (n.)

"person with a high degree of empathic ability," by 1980, from empathic, etc. (compare psychopath/psychopathic).

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estrogen (n.)
coined 1927 from combining form of estrus + -gen. So called for the hormone's ability to produce estrus.
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cunning (n.)

c. 1300, conninge, "knowledge, understanding, information, learning," a sense now obsolete, verbal noun from connen, cunnen "to have ability or capacity," from Old English cunnan (see can v.1). By mid-14c. as "ability to understand, intelligence; wisdom, prudence;" sense of "cleverness, shrewdness, practical skill in a secret or crafty manner" is by late 14c. 

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endurance (n.)
late 15c., "continued existence in time;" see endure + -ance. Meaning "ability to bear suffering, etc." is from 1660s.
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self-discipline (n.)

"ability to restrain or guide or control oneself," 1690s; see self- + discipline (n.). Related: Self-disciplined.

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