Etymology
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fly-by-night (n.)
1796, slang, said by Grose to be an old term of reproach to a woman signifying that she was a witch; used from 1823 in reference to anyone who departs hastily from a recent activity, especially while owing money. The different senses involve the two verbs fly.
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abidance (n.)

"act of continuing or abiding," 1640s, from abide + -ance.

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abiding (adj.)
late 14c., "enduring, steadfast," present-participle adjective from abide (v.). Related: Abidingly.
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abode (n.)

mid-13c., "action of waiting," verbal noun from abiden "to abide" (see abide). It is formally identical with the old, strong past participle of abide (Old English abad), but the modern conjugation is weak and abided is used. The present-to-preterite vowel change is consistent with an Old English class I strong verb (ride/rode, etc.). Meaning "habitual residence" is first attested 1570s.

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compromise (n.)
Origin and meaning of compromise

early 15c., "a joint promise to abide by an arbiter's decision," from Old French compromis (13c.), from Late Latin compromissus, past participle of compromittere "to make a mutual promise" (to abide by the arbiter's decision), from com "with, together" (see com-) + promittere "to send forth; let go; foretell; assure beforehand, promise," from pro "before" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before") + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission).

The sense of "a coming to terms, a settlement of differences by mutual concessions" (mid-15c.) is from extension to the settlement itself. The meaning "that which results from such an agreement" is from 1510s.

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Menelaus 
king of Sparta, husband of Helen, brother of Agamemnon, Latinized form of Greek Menelaos, literally "restraining the people," from menein "to stay, abide, remain" + laos "people" (see lay (adj.)).
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*men- (3)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to remain." It forms all or part of: maisonette; manor; manse; mansion; menage; menial; immanent; permanent; remain; remainder.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Persian mandan "to remain;" Greek menein "to remain;" Latin manere "to stay, abide."

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dree (v.)

"to suffer, bear, endure," Old English dreogan "to work, suffer, endure" (see drudge (v.)). Phrase dree one's weird "abide one's fate or destiny" is from 14c. Perhaps from a tendency to be confused with draw, the verb faded from use but lingered in North of England and Scottish dialect and was revived as an archaism by Scott and his imitators.

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manor (n.)

c. 1300, maner, "mansion, habitation, country residence, principal house of an estate," also "a manorial estate," from Anglo-French maner, Old French manoir "abode, home, dwelling place; manor" (12c.), noun use of maneir "to dwell," from Latin manere "to stay, abide," from PIE root *men- (3) "to remain." As a unit of territorial division in Britain and some American colonies (usually "land held in demesne by a lord, with tenants") it is attested from 1530s.

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Agamemnon 
king of Mycenae, leader of the Greeks in the Trojan War, his name perhaps represents Greek *Aga-med-mon, literally "ruling mightily," from intensifying prefix aga- "very much" + medon "ruler" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures"). But others (Liddell & Scott) connect the second part with menein "to stay, abide, remain," for a literal sense "very steadfast."
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