Etymology
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lytic (adj.)
"pertaining to lysis," 1889, from Greek lytikos "able to loose, loosing," from lytos "loosed," verbal adjective of lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). Related: Lytically.
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lysol (n.)
brown oily coal-tar solution used as a disinfectant, 1890, coined, perhaps in German, from Greek lysis "dissolution, dissolving" (from lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie," from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart") + -ol, element indicating "oil."
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hydrolysis (n.)
"chemical decomposition by water," 1879, formed in English from hydro- + Greek lysis "a loosening, a dissolution," from lyein "to loosen, dissolve" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). Related: Hydrolitic (1875).
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lysergic (adj.)
in reference to a crystalline organic compound, 1934, from the -lys- in hydrolysis (thus from Greek lysis "a loosening, a dissolution," from lyein "to loosen, dissolve;" from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart") + the first syllable of ergot (a fungus from which the chemical was first obtained) + -ic.
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analytic (adj.)
"relating to or operating by analogy," c. 1600, from Medieval Latin analyticus, from Greek analytikos "analytical," from analytos "dissolved," from analyein "unloose, release, set free," from ana "up, back, throughout" (see ana-) + lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to unfasten" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart").
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-lytic 
word-forming element used in making adjectives corresponding to nouns in -lysis, from Greek -lytikos, from lytikos "able to loose, loosing," from lytos "loosed," verbal adjective of lyein "to unfasten, loose, loosen, untie" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart").
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analytics (n.)
the division of logic which distinguishes good from bad arguments, 1590s, from Latin analytica from Greek analytika, from stem of analyein "unloose, release, set free," from ana "up, back, throughout" (see ana-) + lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to unfasten" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"); also see -ics. Ta Analytika was the name of Aristotle's treatises on logic.
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pyrolusite (n.)

"manganese dioxide," a common ore, 1828, from Greek elements pyro- "by heat, by fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire") + lysis "a loosening" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). The name was given in Roman times, when the substance was used, in a heated state, to de-colorize glass.

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electrolysis (n.)

"decomposition into constituent parts by an electric current," 1834; the name was introduced by Faraday on the suggestion of the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath, from electro- + Greek lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to loosen, set free" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). Originally of tumors, later (1879) of hair removal. Related: electrolytic.

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analytical (adj.)
"employing analytic methods," 1520s, with -al (1) + Medieval Latin analyticus, from Medieval Latin analyticus, from Greek analytikos "analytical," from analytos "dissolved," from analyein "unloose, release, set free," from ana "up, back, throughout" (see ana-) + lysis "a loosening," from lyein "to unfasten" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart").

In linguistics, of languages that use particles and auxiliaries (rather than inflections) to modify meaning and show relations of words, from 1830. Analytical chemistry resolves compounds into elements. Related: Analytically.
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