Etymology
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proteinuria 

"presence of abnormal levels of protein in the urine," 1911, Modern Latin, from French protéinurie; see protein + urine + abstract noun ending -ia.

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acomia (n.)

"baldness," Modern Latin, from Greek akomos "hairless, bald," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + komē "hair" (see comet) + abstract noun suffix -ia.

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hypothermia (n.)
1877, Modern Latin, from hypo- "under" (see hypo-) + Greek therme "heat" (from PIE root *gwher- "to heat, warm") + abstract noun ending -ia.
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macadamia (n.)

Australian evergreen tree, commercially important for its edible nut, 1904, from Modern Latin (1858), named for Scotland-born chemist Dr. John Macadam, secretary of the Victoria Philosophical Institute, Australia, + abstract noun ending -ia.

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hyperaesthesia (n.)

"exalted sensation," 1835, from Modern Latin (1783), from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + Greek aisthēsis "feeling" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive") + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Hyperaesthetic.

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eclampsia (n.)
1866, from Modern Latin, from Greek eklampsis "a shining forth, exceeding brightness," from ek- "out" (see ex-) + stem of lampein "to shine" (see lamp) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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paraesthesia (n.)

also paresthesia, "abnormal sensation, hallucination of the senses," 1835, from para- (1), here meaning "disordered," + Greek aisthēsis "perception, feeling" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive") + abstract noun ending -ia.

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polydipsia (n.)

in pathology, "excessive thirst," 1650s, from Greek polydipsios "very thirsty," from polys "much, many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + dipsa "thirst" (a word of unknown origin) + -ia "condition of."

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stichomythia (n.)
"dialogue in alternate lines," Latinized from Greek stikhomythia, from stikhos (see stichic) + mythos "speech, talk" (see myth) + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Stichomythic.
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begonia (n.)
showy flowering plant native to warm regions, 1751, from French begonia (1706), named by French botanist Charles Plumier for Michel Bégon (1638-1710), French governor of Santo Domingo (Haiti) and patron of botany, + abstract noun ending -ia.
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