Etymology
Advertisement
waitress (n.)
"woman who waits tables at a restaurant," 1834, from waiter + -ess.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
huntress (n.)
late 14c.; see hunter + -ess. Old English had hunticge.
Related entries & more 
heiress (n.)
1650s, from heir + -ess. A female heir, but especially a woman who has inherited, or stands to inherit, considerable wealth.
Related entries & more 
shepherdess (n.)

"female keeper of sheep," also "wife of a shepherd; a rural lass," late 14c. (early 14c. as a surname), from shepherd (n.) + -ess.

Related entries & more 
Druidess (n.)

"female Druid; Druidic prophetess or priestess," 1755, from Druid + -ess. Formerly, Druid had been used indifferently of both sexes.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
actress (n.)
1580s, "female who does something;" see actor + -ess; stage sense is from 1700. Sometimes French actrice was used. Related: Actressy.
Related entries & more 
authoress (n.)

"female author" in any sense, late 15c., from author (n.) + -ess. In modern use by 19c., author was used regardless of sex.

Related entries & more 
stewardess (n.)
1630s, "female steward," from steward (n.) + -ess. Meaning "female attendant on passenger aircraft" is from 1931; used of ships (where she waited on the female passengers) from 1837.
Related entries & more 
priestess (n.)

"woman who officiates in sacred rites, a female minister of religion," 1690s, from priest + -ess. Earlier was priestress (mid-15c. prēsteresse).

Related entries & more 
prophetess (n.)

"woman who speaks or prognosticates by divine inspiration, a sibyl," late 14c., from or modeled on Old French prophetesse, Late Latin prophetissa. See prophet + -ess.

Related entries & more 

Page 2