Etymology
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pyroxene (n.)

type of mineral, 1800; from Greek pyr "fire" (see pyro-) + xenos "stranger" (see xeno-). According to OED, so named in 1796 by Abbé Haüy, French mineralogist, "because he thought it 'a stranger in the domain of fire' or alien to igneous rocks." Related: Pyroxenic.

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metic (n.)

"resident alien in an ancient Greek state," 1808, from Late Latin metycus, from Greek metoikos, literally "one who has changed his residence," from meta "change" (see meta-) + oikos "dwelling," from oikein "to dwell" (from PIE root *weik- (1) "clan"). Generally they bore the burdens of a citizen and had some of a citizen's privileges.

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pulsar (n.)

"highly magnetized, rotating compact star that emits beams of electromagnetic radiation," 1968, from pulse (n.1), the form on analogy of quasar. When discovered in 1967 via radio telescope, they were thought perhaps to be signals from alien civilizations and astronomers informally dubbed them LGM for "Little Green Men."

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peregrinate (v.)

"to travel from place to place," 1590s, from Latin peregrinatus, past participle of peregrinari "to travel abroad, be alien," figuratively "to wander, roam, travel about," from peregrinus "from foreign parts, foreigner," from peregre (adv.) "abroad," properly "from abroad, found outside Roman territory," from per "away" (see per) + agri, locative of ager "field, territory, land, country" (from PIE root *agro- "field").

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naturalize (v.)

1550s, "admit (an alien) to rights of a citizen" (implied in naturalized), from natural (adj.) in its etymological sense of "by birth" + -ize. In some instances from French naturaliser. Of words or expressions, "adopt as native or vernacular," 1590s. Of plants or animals, "introduce and acclimatize in places or situations where they are not indigenous," by 1708. Related: Naturalizing.

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hag-ridden (n.)

1680s, "ridden by hags or witches," past-participle adjective from hag-ride (1660s); see hag (n.) + ridden. From 1702 as "oppressed, harassed;" 1758 as "afflicted by nightmares." An old term for sleep paralysis (the sensation of being held immobile in bed, often by a heavy weight, and accompanied by a sense of alien presence). A holed stone hung over the bed was said to prevent it.

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Barbara 
fem. proper name, from Latin, fem. of barbarus "strange, foreign, barbarous," from Greek barbaros (see barbarian (n.)). For women, unlike men, the concept of "alien" presumably could be felt as "exotic" and thus make an appealing name. Popularized as a Christian name by the legend of Saint Barbara, early 4c. martyr, whose cult flourished from 7c. The common Middle English form was Barbary. A top 10 name in popularity for girls born in the U.S. between 1927 and 1958.
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denizen (n.)

early 15c., "a citizen, a dweller, an inhabitant," especially "legally established inhabitant of a city or borough, a citizen as distinguished from a non-resident native or a foreigner," from Anglo-French deinzein, denzein, (Old French deinzein) "one within" (the privileges of a city franchise; opposed to forein "one without"), from deinz "within, inside," from Late Latin deintus, from de- "from" + intus "within" (see ento-).

Historically, an alien admitted to certain rights of citizenship in a country; a naturalized citizen (but ineligible to public office). Formerly also an adjective, "within the city franchise, having certain rights and privileges of citizenship" (late 15c.). Compare foreign.

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strange (adj.)

late 13c., straunge, "from elsewhere, foreign, unknown, unfamiliar, not belonging to the place where found," from Old French estrange "foreign, alien, unusual, unfamiliar, curious; distant; inhospitable; estranged, separated" (Anglo-French estraunge, strange, straunge; Modern French étrange), from Latin extraneus "foreign, external, from without" (source also of Italian strano "strange, foreign," Spanish extraño), from extra "outside of" (see extra-). In early use also strounge. The surname Lestrange is attested from late 12c. Sense of "queer, surprising" is attested from c. 1300, also "aloof, reserved, distant; estranged." In nuclear physics, from 1956.

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epact (n.)
1550s, "a number attached to a year to show the number of days into the calendar moon on which the solar year begins;" 1580s, "number of days by which the solar year exceeds a lunar one of 12 moons;" from French épacte (12c.), from Late Latin epacta "an intercalary day," from Greek epakte (plural epaktai, in epaktai hemerai "intercalary days"), from fem. of epaktos "brought in, imported, alien," verbal adjective of epagein "to add, bring forward," also "intercalate," from epi "on" (see epi-) + agein "put in motion, move; push forward, advance," from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move." Related: Epactal.
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