Etymology
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palpitant (adj.)

"pulsating, visibly throbbing," 1837, from French palpitant (early 16c.), from Latin palpitantem, present participle of palpitare "to move frequently and swiftly, tremble, throb," frequentative of palpare "to touch" (see palpable).

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palpitate (v.)

"to beat or pulse rapidly, to throb," 1620s, from Latin palpitatus, past participle of palpitare "to throb, flutter" (see palpable). Related: Palpitated; palpitating.

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palpitation (n.)

early 15c., palpitacioun, "rapid movement, trembling or quivering motion," from Latin palpitationem (nominative palpitatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of palpitare "to throb, to flutter, to tremble, to quiver," frequentative of palpare "touch gently, stroke; wheedle, coax" (see palpable). Specifically of unnatural rapid beating or pulsation of the heart (excited by emotion, disease, etc.) by c. 1600.

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palsgrave (n.)

1540s, "a count palatine," from Middle Dutch palsgrave, from pals "palace" (from Latin palatium, see palace) + grave (modern Dutch graaf) "count" (see margrave). Similar formation in Middle High German pfalzgrave, German Pfalzgraf. Related: Palsgravine.

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palsied (adj.)

"paralyzed; deprived of energy or power of action," 1540s, past-participle adjective from palsy.

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palsy (n.)

c. 1300, palesie, "weakness, numbness, paralysis, loss of ability to speak, failure of a part of the body to function properly," from Anglo-French parlesie, Old French paralisie, from Vulgar Latin *paralysia, from Latin paralysis, from Greek paralysis "paralysis, palsy," literally "loosening," from paralyein "disable, enfeeble," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + lyein "loosen, untie" (from PIE root *leu- "to loosen, divide, cut apart"). A doublet of paralysis.

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palter (v.)

1530s, "speak indistinctly" (a sense now obsolete), a word of unknown origin. It has the form of a frequentative, but no verb palt is known. Connection with paltry is uncertain. Via the notion of "talk in a trifling manner, babble," hence "talk insincerely," comes the sense "play fast and loose" (c. 1600), also transitive, "trifle away, squander" (1620s). Related: Paltered; paltering; palterer.

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paltry (adj.)

"mean, worthless, despicable," 1560s, probably an adjectival use of noun paltry "worthless thing" (1550s), associated with dialectal palt, pelt "trash," cognate with Middle Low German and East Frisian palte "rag," Middle Dutch palt "broken or torn fragment." Similar formation in Low German paltrig "rubbishy," East Frisian palterig "ragged, torn."

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paludal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a marsh or marshes," 1803, with -al (1) + stem of Latin palus "a swamp, a fen, a marsh," from PIE *pelkiz- (source also of Sanskrit palvala- "pond, pool;" Old Prussian pelky "marsh," Lithuanian pėlkė "marsh," Latvian pelce "puddle"). Alternative formations paludine (1832, from French) and paludinous (1866) are later in English.

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Pamela 

fem. given name, invented by Philip Sidney in "Arcadia," published in the 1590s; it is presumed to have been coined from Greek pan- "all" (before a labialpam-; see pan-) + meli "honey" (also the first element in Melissa; from PIE *melit-ya, suffixed form of root *melit- "honey") with the sense "all-sweetness," but this is conjecture. It was boosted by Samuel Richardson's novel "Pamela" (1741) but did not become popular until the 1920s; it was a top-20 name for girls born in the U.S. from 1947 to 1968.

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