Etymology
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fanboy (n.)
"young male enthusiast," by 1988, from fan (n.2) + boy. Fangirl attested from 1989.
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fancied (adj.)
"imaginary, formed by the fancy," 1560s, past-participle adjective from fancy (v.).
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fancier (n.)
"one with a special taste or aptitude (for something)," 1765, agent noun from fancy (v.).
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fanciful (adj.)
1620s, from fancy (n.) + -ful. Related: Fancifully.
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fancy (v.)
"take a liking to," 1540s, a contraction of fantasien "to fantasize (about)," from fantasy (n.). Meaning "imagine" is from 1550s. Related: Fancied; fancies; fancying. Colloquial use in fancy that, etc. is recorded by 1813.
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fancy (n.)
mid-15c., fantsy "inclination, liking," contraction of fantasy. It took the older and longer word's sense of "inclination, whim, desire." Meaning "the productive imagination" is from 1580s. That of "a fanciful image or conception" is from 1660s. Meaning "fans of an amusement or sport, collectively" is attested by 1735, especially (though not originally) of the prize ring. The adjective is recorded from 1751 in the sense "fine, elegant, ornamental" (opposed to plain); later as "involving fancy, of a fanciful nature" (1800). Fancy man attested by 1811.
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fancy-free (adj.)
"free from the trammels of love, having the 'fancy' or affection free," 1580s, from fancy (n.) + free (adj.).
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fandangle (n.)
1835, "useless ornamentation," Southern U.S., perhaps an alteration of fandango.
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fandango (n.)
mid-18c., lively Spanish dance, the word of unknown etymology [OED says "alleged to be of negro origin"], of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to fado (Watkins traces both to Latin fari "to speak"); fado is lovely but not lively, so perhaps the link, if any, is thematic. By extension in American English, "any noisy entertainment."
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fandom (n.)
"the realm of avid enthusiasts," 1903, from fan (n.2) + -dom.
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