Etymology
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rumination (n.)

c. 1600, "act of chewing the cud; act of meditating," from Latin ruminationem (nominative ruminatio) "a chewing the cud," noun of action from past-participle stem of ruminare "to chew the cud," also "turn over in the mind" (see ruminate).

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salience (n.)

1836, "quality of leaping;" 1849, "quality of standing out, state of projecting or being projected;" see salient (adj.) + -ence. The psychological sense of "quality of being more prominent in the mind or memory" is by 1938.

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maieutic (adj.)

"pertaining to the Socratic method of assisting a person, by questions, to discover conceptions latent in his mind," 1650s, from Greek maieutikos, a figurative use in philosophy of a word meaning literally "obstetric," from maieuesthai "act as a midwife," from maia "midwife" (see Maia).

By putting leading questions on general or well-known facts, Socrates, by easy steps, to the surprise and delight of his subject, would bring him to the enunciation of some principle hitherto unknown or undeveloped in his mind. This is called his Maieutic: a term which Socrates himself suggested, likening his relation to the development and birth of ideas in the mind to that mid-wife office which his mother performed for the body. Both this feature and the illustration afforded fine material for jest to Aristophanes, who, in his usual comic way, proceeded to literalize the metaphor. [Samuel Ross Winans, "Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates," Boston: 1890]
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noematic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the understanding, mental, intellectual," 1860, with -ic + Greek noēma "a perception, a thought," from noein "to see, perceive, have mental perception," from noos "mind, thought," which is of uncertain origin. Related: Noematical (1680s); noematically.

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dotage (n.)

late 14c., "condition of being foolish; foolish love, infatuation," literally "the condition of one who dotes," from dote (v.) + -age. Also from late 14c. as "senility; feebleness or imbecility of mind in old age."

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memorize (v.)

1590s, "commit to writing, cause to be remembered by writing or inscription;" see memory + -ize. The meaning "commit to memory, learn by heart, keep in memory, have always in mind" is by 1838. Related: Memorized; memorist; memorizing.

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memorable (adj.)

mid-15c., "worthy to be remembered, not to be forgotten," from Latin memorabilis "that may be told; worthy of being remembered, remarkable," from memorare "to bring to mind," from memor "mindful of" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). Related: Memorably; memorableness.

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dianetics (n.)

1950, coined by U.S. writer L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986). In "Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health" (1950), the glossary connects the word to Greek dianoua "thought." "Self Analysis" by Hubbard (1951) quotes an etymology said to have been added to the Funk & Wagnalls New Standard Dictionary: "Gr. dianoetikos--dia, through plus noos, mind."

There was an earlier dianoetic (1670s) "of or pertaining to thought," from Greek dianoetikos "of or for thinking; intellectual," from dianoetos, verbal adjective from dianoe-esthai "to think," from dia- "through" (see dia-) + noe-ein "to think, suppose," from noos "mind," which is of uncertain origin.

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remember (v.)

mid-14c., remembren, "keep or bear (something or someone) in mind, retain in the memory, preserve unforgotten," from Old French remembrer "remember, recall, bring to mind" (11c.), from Latin rememorari "recall to mind, remember," from re- "again" (see re-) + memorari "be mindful of," from memor "mindful" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember").

The meaning "recall to mind, bring again to the memory" is from late 14c.; the sense of "to mention" is from 1550s. Also in Middle English "to remind" (someone), "bring back the memory of" (something to someone); "give an account, narrate," and in passive constructions such as hit remembreth me "I remember." An Anglo-Saxon verb for it was gemunan.

The insertion of -b- between -m- and a following consonant (especially where a vowel has dropped out) is regular: compare number (n.), chamber (n.), humble (adj.).

Remember implies that a thing exists in the memory, not that it is actually present in the thoughts at the moment, but that it recurs without effort. Recollect means that a fact, forgotten or partially lost to memory, is after some effort recalled and present to the mind. Remembrance is the store-house, recollection the act of culling out this article and that from the repository. He remembers everything he hears, and can recollect any statement when called on. The words, however, are often confounded, and we say we cannot remember a thing when we mean we cannot recollect it. [Century Dictionary, 1895]

In complimentary messages, "remember (one) to (another), recall one to the remembrance of another," as in remember me to your family, is attested from 1550s.

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witty (adj.)
Old English wittig "clever, wise, sagacious; in one's right mind;" see wit (n.) "intellect" + -y (2). Meaning "possessing sparkling wit" is recorded from 1580s. Related: Wittily; wittiness. Middle English had all-witty "omniscient" (c. 1400).
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