Etymology
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drone (v.)

mid-14c., drounen, "to roar, bellow;" c. 1500, "to give forth a monotonous and unvaried tone, hum, or buzz," imitative (see drone (n.)). In modern times it often is the characteristic sound of airplane engines. Meaning "speak in a dull, monotonous tone" is from 1610s. Related: Droned; droning

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entitle (v.)

also intitle, late 14c., "to give a title to a chapter, book, etc.," from Anglo-French entitler, Old French entiteler "entitle, call" (Modern French intituler), from Late Latin intitulare "give a title or name to," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + titulus "title" (see title (n.)).

Meaning "to bestow (on a person) a rank or office" is mid-15c. Sense of "to give (someone) 'title' to an estate or property," hence to give that person a claim to possession or privilege, is mid-15c.; this now is used mostly in reference to circumstances and actions. Related: Entitled; entitling.

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nada (n.)

slang for "nothing," 1933 (Hemingway), from Spanish nada "nothing," from Latin (res) nata "small, insignificant thing," literally "(thing) born," from natus, past participle of nasci "to be born" (Old Latin gnasci), from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget."

First in Hemingway's "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place," set in a Spanish cafe, in which the word figures largely:

What did he fear? It was not fear or dread. It was nothing that he knew too well. It was all a nothing and a man was nothing too. It was only that and light was all it needed and a certain cleanness and order. Some lived it and never felt it but he knew it all was nada y pues nada y nada y pues nada. Our nada who art in nada, nada be thy name thy kingdom nada thy will be nada in nada as it is in nada. Give us this nada our daily nada and nada us our nada as we nada our nadas and nada us not into nada but deliver us from nada; pues nada. Hail nothing full of nothing, nothing is with thee.
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fashion (v.)

"to form, give shape to," early 15c.; see fashion (n.). Related: Fashioned; fashioning.

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bathyscaphe (n.)

"diving apparatus for reaching great depths," 1947, a name coined by its inventor, Swiss "scientific extremist" Prof. Auguste Piccard, from Greek bathys "deep" (see benthos) + skaphē "light boat, skiff" (see scaphoid).

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donative (adj.)

"characterized by being given or presented," especially "vested or vesting by donation," 1550s, from Latin donativus, from donare "give as a gift" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). As a noun, "a gift or present," from mid-15c.

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term (v.)

"to give a particular name to," 1550s, from term (n.). Related: Termed; terming.

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irregardless (adj.)

an erroneous word that, etymologically, means the opposite of what it is used to express; probably a blend of irrespective and regardless, and perhaps inspired by the colloquial use of the double negative as an emphatic. Attested from at least 1870s (e.g. "Portsmouth Times," Portsmouth, Ohio, U.S.A., April 11, 1874: "We supported the six successful candidates for Council in the face of a strong opposition. We were led to do so because we believed every man of them would do his whole duty, irregardless of party, and the columns of this paper for one year has [sic] told what is needed.").

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foal (v.)

"give birth (to a foal)," late 14c., from foal (n.). Related: Foaled; foaling.

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natal (adj.)

late 14c., "of or pertaining to birthdays;" mid-15c., "of or pertaining to one's birth," from Latin natalis "pertaining to birth or origin," from natus, past participle of nasci "to be born" (Old Latin gnasci), from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget." It is the learned form of Noel, which was the French vernacular word.

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