Etymology
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yowl (v.)
c. 1200, yuhelen, probably of imitative origin (compare jubilant). Related: Yowled; yowling. The noun is recorded from mid-15c.
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yowza 
colloquial form of yes, sir, 1934, popularized by U.S. bandleader and radio personality Ben "The Old Maestro" Bernie (1891-1943).
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yo-yo (n.)
1915, apparently from a language of the Philippines. Registered as a trademark in Vancouver, Canada, in 1932, the year the first craze for them began (subsequent fads 1950s, 1970s, 1998). The toy itself is much older and was earlier known as bandalore (1802), a word of obscure origin, "but it was from American contact in the Philippines that the first commercial development was established" [Century Dictionary]. Figurative sense of any "up-and-down movement" is first recorded 1932. Meaning "stupid person" is recorded from 1970. The verb in the figurative sense is attested from 1967.
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ytterbium (n.)
metallic rare-earth element, 1879, coined in Modern Latin by Swedish chemist Carl Gustaf Mosander (1797-1858) from Ytterby, name of a town in Sweden where mineral containing it was found. With metallic element ending -ium.
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yttrium 
metallic rare-earth element, 1866, coined in Modern Latin by Swedish chemist Carl Gustaf Mosander (1797-1858) from Ytterby, name of a town in Sweden where mineral containing it was found. With metallic element ending -ium.
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yuan (n.)
Chinese unit of currency introduced 1914, from Chinese yuan "round, round object, circle."
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Yucatan 
said to be from a local word meaning "massacre." Related: Yucatecan.
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yucca (n.)
Central and South American name for the cassava plant, 1550s, from Spanish yuca, juca (late 15c.), probably from Taino, native language of Haiti.
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yuck (2)
"laugh," 1938, yock, probably imitative.
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yuck (1)
exclamation of disgust, 1966, origin perhaps echoic (compare Newfoundland slang yuck "to vomit," 1963; U.S. slang yuck "despised person," 1943; provincial English yuck "the itch, mange, scabies"). Variant yech is by 1969.
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