Etymology
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saleable (adj.)

also, but less commonly, salable, "purchasable; capable of being sold, finding a ready market," 1520s, from sale + -able. Related: Salability; saleability (1797) which seems to have appeared first in Coleridge.

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Salem 

place mentioned in Genesis xiv.18, from Hebrew Shālēm, usually said to be another name for Jerusalem and to mean "peace" (compare Hebrew shalom, Arabic salaam). A typical meetinghouse name among Baptists and Methodists, so much so that by mid-19c. it (along with Bethel and Ebenezer) had come to be used in Britain generically to mean "non-conformist chapel."

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salep (n.)

1736, "drug from starch or jelly made from dried tubers of orchid-like plants," from Turkish salep, from a dialectal pronunciation of Arabic thahleb, which, according to OED, is "taken to be a shortening of khasyu 'th-thahleb orchis (lit. 'fox's testicles' ...)" and it goes on to compare a native English orchid name, dogstones.

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Salerno 

city in southern Italy, noted in the Middle Ages for its medical school, from Latin Salernum, said to be ultimately from a non-Indo-European language. Related: Salernitan (from Latin Salernitanus).

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sales 

"of or pertaining to sale, sales, or the business of selling," word-forming element from genitive of sale (n.), by 1520s, in salesman. Cf. saleswork "work done for sale" (1775). For earlier use of similar formations, compare craftsman, oarsman, both Middle English. Sales tax is attested by 1886; sales clerk by 1863; sales associate by 1946. Sales representative is from 1910.

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salesman (n.)

"one whose occupation is the selling of goods, services, or merchandise," 1520s, from man (n.) + sales (q.v.), genitive of sale (n.). Compare craftsman, tradesman.

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salesmanship (n.)

"character or qualities of a (good) salesman," 1853, from salesman + -ship.

The modern system of salesmanship has become so much like persecution reduced to a science, that it is quite a luxury to be allowed the use of your own discretion, without being dragooned, by a shopkeeper's deputy, into looking at what you do not care to see, or buying what you would not have. A man in his sane mind, with the usual organs of speech, has a right to be treated as if he knows what he wants, and is able to ask for it. [The Literary World, Feb. 26, 1853]
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salesperson (n.)

by 1875; see sales + person. Generally intended to apply to persons of either sex, when it wasn't a blind swerve away from vulgar saleswoman or saleslady.

WANTED, an experienced LADY ASSISTANT, good salesperson, for a Bookseller's and Stationer's Shop, with Library. Permanent to a suitable person. Apply W. PORTER and SONS, Herald Office, Blackpool. [advertisement in The Bookseller, May 4, 1875] 
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saleswoman (n.)

1704, "woman who waits upon customers in a shop or store;" see sales + woman, and compare salesman, salesperson. Saleslady (by 1856) is marked in Century Dictionary as "Vulgar, U.S." Saleswomanship is attested by 1973.

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Salic (adj.)

"based on or contained in the law code of the Salian Franks," 1540s, from French Salique, from Medieval Latin Salicus, from the Salian Franks, a name given to a Frankish Germanic tribe that once lived near the Zuider Zee, the ancestors of the Merovingian kings, and it means "those living near the river Sala" (the modern Ijssel).

The Salic Law, a supposed code of law of the ancient Germanic tribes, was invoked 1316 by Philip V of France to exclude a woman from succeeding to the throne of France (and later to combat the French claims of Edward III of England), but the precise meaning of the cited passage is unclear.

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