Etymology
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falseness (n.)
c. 1300, "deceitfulness, treachery, faithlessness, dishonesty," from false + -ness.
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falsetto (n.)
"artificially high voice," 1774, from Italian falsetto, diminutive of falso "false," from Latin falsus (see false). Earlier in an Englished form as falset (1707). One who sings thus is a falsettist.
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falsies (n.)
"padded brassiere," 1943, from false + -ie.
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falsifiable (adj.)
1610s, from falsify + -able or from French falsifiable. Related: Falsifiability.
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falsification (n.)

"act of making false, false representation; a showing to be false or erroneous," 1560s, from Late Latin falsificationem (nominative falsificatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of falsificare "to falsify" (see falsify).

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falsify (v.)

mid-15c., falsifien, "to prove false," from Old French falsifier "to falsify, counterfeit" (15c.), from Late Latin falsificare "make false, corrupt," from Latin falsus "erroneous, mistaken" (see false). Meaning "to make false" is from c. 1500. Earlier verb was simply falsen (c. 1200). Related: Falsified; falsifying.

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falsity (n.)
c. 1300, "deceitfulness, treachery, dishonesty," from Old French fauseté "falsehood" (12c., Modern French fausseté), from Late Latin falsitatem (nominative falsitas), from Latin falsus "erroneous, mistaken" (see false). From late 14c. as "untrue statement or doctrine;" from 1570s as "character of being not true."
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Falstaffian (adj.)
"fat, humorous, jovial," 1782, from Shakespeare's character.
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falter (v.)
late 14c., "to stagger, totter," of unknown origin, possibly from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse faltrask "be burdened, hesitate, be troubled"), or else a frequentative of Middle English falden "to fold," influenced by fault (but OED rejects any direct connection to that word). Of the tongue, "to stammer," mid-15c. Related: Faltered; faltering.
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fame (n.)

early 13c., "character attributed to someone;" late 13c., "celebrity, renown," from Old French fame "fame, reputation, renown, rumor" (12c.), from Latin fama "talk, rumor, report; reputation, public opinion; renown, good reputation," but also "ill-fame, scandal, reproach," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say."

The goddess Fama was the personification of rumor in Roman mythology. The Latin derivative fabulare was the colloquial word for "speak, talk" since the time of Plautus, whence Spanish hablar.

I've always been afraid I was going to tap the world on the shoulder for 20 years, and when it finally turned around I was going to forget what I had to say. [Tom Waits, Playboy magazine interview, March, 1988]
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