Etymology
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youngster (n.)
1580s, from young (adj.) + -ster. Earlier was youngling, from Old English geongling.
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younker 
c. 1500, "young nobleman," from Middle Dutch jonckher (Dutch jonker), from jonc "young" (see young (adj.)) + here "lord, master" (see Herr). Compare junker.
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your 
Old English eower, possessive pronominal adjective, genitive of ge "ye" (see ye), from Proto-Germanic base of you. Cognate with Old Saxon iuwar, Old Frisian iuwer, Old Norse yðvarr, Old High German iuwer, German euer, Gothic izwar "your." Used in titles of honor by mid-14c.
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yourn (pron.)
dialectal possessive pronoun from your, attested from late 14c. See her.
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yours (pron.)

absolutive form of your, c. 1300, on model of his, ours, etc. Yours truly "myself" is from 1833, from the common subscription of letters.

It is difficult to say what will succeed, and still more to pronounce what will not. I am at this moment in that uncertainty (on our own score,) and it is no small proof of the author's powers to be able to charm and fix a mind's attention on similar subjects and climates in such a predicament. That he may have the same effect upon all his readers is very sincerely the wish, and hardly the doubt, of yours truly,
"B."
[Lord Byron to John Murray, Dec. 4, 1813]
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yourself 

by early 14c., from your + self. Plural yourselves is attested by 1520s.

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youse 
dialectal inflection of you, 1876, not always used in plural senses.
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youth (n.)

Old English geoguð "youth; young people, junior warriors; young of cattle," related to geong "young," from Proto-Germanic *jugunthi- (source also of Old Saxon juguth, Old Frisian jogethe, Middle Dutch joghet, Dutch jeugd, Old High German jugund, German Jugend, Gothic junda "youth"), from suffixed form of PIE root *yeu- "vital force, youthful vigor" (see young (adj.)) + Proto-Germanic abstract noun suffix *-itho (see -th (2)).

According to OED, the Proto-Germanic form apparently was altered from *juwunthiz by influence of its contrast, *dugunthiz "ability" (source of Old English duguð). In Middle English, the medial -g- became a yogh, which then disappeared.

They said that age was truth, and that the young
Marred with wild hopes the peace of slavery
[Shelley]
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youthful (adj.)
1560s, from youth + -ful. Old English had geoguðlic. Other words formerly used in the same sense were youthlike, youthly, youthsome, youthy. Related: Youthfulness.
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yow 
exclamation, with various meanings, mid-15c.
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