Etymology
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tat (v.)

1882, "to do tatting," back-formation from tatting.

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reimport (v.)

also re-import, "carry back to the company of exportation," 1742, from re- "back, again" + import (v.). Related: Reimported; reimporting; reimportation.

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resorb (v.)

"absorb again, take back that which has been given out," 1630s, from French résorber or directly from Latin resorbere "to suck back," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + sorbere "to suck" (see absorb). Related: Resorbed; resorbing; resorbent.

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retort (n.2)

"vessel with a long neck bent downward, used in chemistry for distilling or effecting decomposition by the aid of heat," c. 1600, from French retorte, from Medieval Latin *retorta "a retort, a vessel with a bent neck," literally "a thing bent or twisted," from past-participle stem of Latin retorquere "turn back, twist back, throw back," from re- "back" (see re-) + torquere "to twist" (from PIE root *terkw- "to twist").

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recede (v.)

early 15c., receden, "to depart, go away," a sense now rare or obsolete; of things, "to move back, retreat, withdraw,"  from Old French receder and directly from Latin recedere "to go back, fall back; withdraw, depart, retire," from re- "back" (see re-) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Sense of "to have a backward inclination, slope, or tendency" is by 1866. Related: Receded; receding.

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regress (v.)

1550s, "to return to a former state or place, go back," from Latin regressus "a return, retreat, a going back," noun use of past participle of regredi "to go back," from re- "back" (see re-) + gradi "to step, walk" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go").

In astronomy, "appear to move in a backward direction," by 1823. The psychological sense of "to return to an earlier stage of life" is attested from 1926. Related: Regressed; regressing.

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laze (v.)

1590s, back-formation from lazy. Related: Lazed; lazing.

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motile (adj.)

"capable of spontaneous movement," 1831, back-formation from motility.

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glitz (n.)

"showiness without substance," 1977, a back-formation from glitzy.

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