Etymology
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Zurich 
city and lake in Switzerland, German Zürich, said to be ultimately from Celtic root *dur- "water."
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zwieback (n.)
1894, from German Zweiback "biscuit," literally "twice-baked," from zwei "two, twice" + backen "to bake;" loan-translation of Italian biscotto (see biscuit).
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Zwinglian (adj.)
1532, after Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), Swiss Protestant reformer who revolted from the Roman communion in 1516 but who differed from Luther on theological points relating to the real presence in the Eucharist.
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zydeco (n.)
1949, perhaps from Creole French pronunciation of French les haricots "the beans," part of the title of a popular dance tune ("les haricots sont pas salés").
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zygoma (n.)
"bony arch of the cheek," plural zygomata, 1680s, Modern Latin, from Greek zygoma, from zygon "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). So called because it connects the bones of the face with those of the skull about the ear.
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zygomatic (adj.)
"pertaining to the zygoma," 1709, from Latin zygomaticus, from Greek zygoma (see zygoma).
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zygote (n.)
1880, coined 1878 by German cytologist Eduard Strasburger (1844-1912), the widespread attribution to William Bateson being apparently erroneous; from Greek zygotos "yoked," from zygon "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join").
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Zyklon (n.)
type of fumigant used to kill rats in enclosed spaces, such as holds of ships, boxcars, etc., 1926, from German Zyklon, commercial name of a type of hydrogen cyanide, said to be of unknown etymology, but it is the usual German form of the word cyclone. There were at least three varieties, A, B, and C, Zyklon-B being the one notoriously used in the Nazi death camps.
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zymurgy (n.)

branch of chemistry which deals with wine-making and brewing, 1868, from Greek zymo-, combining form of zymē "a leaven" (from PIE root *yeue-; see juice) + -ourgia "a working," from ergon "work" (from PIE root *werg- "to do").

The last word in many standard English dictionaries (and this one); but Century Dictionary ends with Zyxomma ("A genus of Indian dragon-flies") and in the OED [2nd ed.] the last word is zyxt, an obsolete Kentish form of the second person singular of see (v.).

At the dictionary's letter A
Mr. Brandt is young and gay
But when at last he reaches zed
He's in his wheelchair, nearly dead
[Einar Haugen]
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