Etymology
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dossier (n.)

"bundle of documents referring to some matter," 1880 (by 1868 as a French word in English), from French dossier "bundle of papers," from dos "back" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *dossum, variant of Latin dorsum "back" (see dorsal). Supposedly so called because the bundle bore a label on the back, or possibly from resemblance of the bulge in a mass of bundled papers to the curve of a back. Old French dossiere meant "back-strap, ridge strap (of a horse's harness)."

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remand (v.)

mid-15c., remaunden, "to send (something) back," from Anglo-French remaunder, Old French remander "send for again" (12c.) or directly from Late Latin remandare "to send back word, repeat a command," from Latin re- "back" (see re-) + mandare "to consign, order, commit to one's charge" (see mandate (n.)).

The meaning "command or order to go back to a place" is by 1580s. Specifically in law, "send back (a prisoner) on refusing his application for discharge," by 1640s. Related: Remanded; remanding; remandment.

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restream (v.)

also re-stream, 1711, "to stream back," from re- "back, again" + stream (v.). Related: Restreamed; restreaming.

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reprise (n.)

late 14c., "yearly deduction from charges upon a manor or estate," from Old French reprise "act of taking back" (13c.), fem. of repris, past participle of reprendre "take back," from Latin reprendere"pull back, hold back" (see reprehend). The meaning "resumption of an action" is attested from 1680s. The musical sense of "a repeated passage, act of repeating a passage" is by 1879.

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re-charge (v.)

"rush at or attack back or again," intransitive, 1590s, from re- "back, again" + charge (v.). Related: Re-charged; re-charging.

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return (v.)

early 14c., returnen, "to come back, come or go back to a former position" (intransitive), from Old French retorner, retourner "turn back, turn round, return" (Modern French retourner), from re- "back" (see re-) + torner "to turn" (see turn (v.)). Also in part from Medieval Latin retornare, returnare.

The transitive sense of "report officially, give an official statement or account" (in answer to a writ or demand) is from early 15c.; "to send (someone or something) back" is by mid-15c.; that of "to turn back" is from c. 1500. Meaning "to give in repayment or recompense" is from 1590s; that of "give back, restore" is from c. 1600. Related: Returned; returning.

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retreat (v.)

early 15c., retreten, "to draw in, draw back, leave the extremities," also "to fall back from battle;" from retreat (n.) and in part from Old French retret, retrait, past participle of retrere "to draw back." Related: Retreated; retreating.

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resend (v.)

also re-send, "to send back or again," 1550s, from re- "back, again" + send (v.). Related: Resent; resending.

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reply (v.)

late 14c., replien, "respond verbally, make an answer; make opposition, retaliate," from Old French replier "to reply, turn back," from Late Latin replicare "to reply, repeat," in classical Latin "fold back, fold over, bend back," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").

The classical literal sense of "to fold back, turn or fold (something) back" is attested from early 15c. in English but is not now used. Modern French répliquer is formed directly from the Latin verb and used in the sense of "to replicate," also "to reply," while replier, reploier is for the literal senses "to fold, fold up, curl up." Related: Replied; replying.

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redux (adj.)

"restored, brought back," as from a distance, captivity, etc., Latin redux "that leads or brings back; led or brought back," from reducere (see reduce). In book titles at least since 1662 (Dryden, "Astraea Redux," written on the restoration of Charles II).

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