Etymology
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albino (n.)

"a person of pale, milky complexion, with light hair and pink eyes," also used of an animal characterized by the same condition or a plant with white leaves or flowers, 1777, from Spanish or Portuguese albino, from Latin albus "white" (see alb). Used by Portuguese of white-spotted African negroes. Extended 1859 to animals having the same peculiarity. As an adjective form albinotic is modeled on hypnotic and other words from Greek; albinistic also is used. A female form, if one is still wanted, was albiness (1808).

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trencher (n.)

"wooden platter on which to cut meat," c. 1300, from Anglo-French trenchour, Old North French trencheor "a trencher," literally "a cutting place," from Old French trenchier "to cut, carve, slice" (see trench).

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Neufchatel 

type of soft, white cheese, 1833, from Neufchâtel, small town in Normandy where it first was made.

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smoker (n.)

1590s, "one who cures meat," agent noun from smoke (v.). Meaning "one who smokes tobacco" is from 1610s. Railway meaning "smoking car" is from 1875. Smoker's cough attested from 1898.

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slaughterhouse (n.)

also slaughter-house, late 14c., "place where animals are butchered for meat," from slaughter (n.) + house (n.). The Slaughter-house cases in U.S. history were 1873.

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rack (n.4)

"cut of animal meat and bones," usually involving the neck and forepart of the spine, 1560s, of unknown origin; perhaps from some resemblance to rack (n.1). Compare rack-bone "vertebrae" (1610s).

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risotto (n.)

rice cooked in broth with meat and cheese, 1848, from Italian risotto, from riso "rice" (see rice). At first in Italian contexts; it begins to appear in English cookery books c. 1880.

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bobwhite (n.)

also bob-white, North American partridge or quail, 1819, so called from the sound of its cry.

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hoarfrost (n.)

"white frost formed by freezing dew," c. 1300, hore-forst; see hoar + frost (n.).

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brose (n.)

Scottish dish of boiling milk, liquid in which meat has been broiled, seasoning, etc., poured over oatmeal or barley meal, 1650s, Scottish, earlier browes, from Old French broez, nominative of broet (13c.) "stew, soup made from meat broth," diminutive of breu, from Medieval Latin brodium, from Old High German brod "broth" (see broth). Athol brose (1801) was "honey and whisky mixed together in equal parts," taken as a cure for hoarseness or sore throat.

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