Etymology
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pictures (n.)

"movies," 1912, short for moving pictures.

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bub (n.)

"a woman's breast," 1860, short for bubby.

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runcible 

1871, a nonsense word coined by Edward Lear in "The Owl & the Pussy-Cat" (runcible spoon). The phrase runcible spoon has been used since 1926 for "spoon with three short tines like a fork," but OED writes that "the illustrations provided by himself for his books of verse give no warrant for this later interpretation."

As for Lear's inspiration for the word, suspicion falls on runcival, a contemporary variant of the old word rounceval "something big and loud," which is said to be from Roncevaux (French Rouncesvalles), the pass in the Pyrenees where Roland fell in battle.

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bowling (n.)

1530s, "the act of playing at bowls," verbal noun from bowl (v.). Bowling-alley "a covered place for the playing of bowls, provided with a passage of smooth planks for the rolling of the balls," is from 1550s; bowling-green "level piece of greensward kept smooth for bowling" is from 1640s.

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shivah (n.)

seven-day mourning period in Jewish religious custom, 1892, from Hebrew shibhah "seven," short for shibh'ath yeme ha'ebhel "the seven days of mourning" for the dead.

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quid pro quo 

"one thing in place of another," 1560s, from Latin, literally "something for something, one thing for another," from nominative (quid) and ablative (quo) neuter singulars of relative pronoun qui "who" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) + pro "for" (see pro-).

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vend (v.)

1620s, from Latin vendere "to sell, give for a bribe; praise, cry up," contraction of venumdare "offer for sale," from venum "for sale" (see venal) + dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Related: Vended; vending; vendible (early 14c.). Vending machine is recorded from 1889.

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