Etymology
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obstruct (v.)

1610s, "to block or stop up with obstacles or impediments," a back-formation from obstruction or else from Latin obstructus, past participle of obstruere "build up, block, block up, build against, stop, bar, hinder," from ob "in front of, in the way of" (see ob-) + struere "to pile, build" (from PIE *streu-, extended form of root *stere- "to spread"). Figurative sense of "to hinder, impede, retard, delay" (justice, the law, etc.) is by 1640s. Related: Obstructed; obstructing.

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obstruction (n.)

"action of blocking up a way or passage, act of impeding passage or movement; fact of being obstructed," 1530s, from Latin obstructionem (nominative obstructio) "an obstruction, barrier, a building up," noun of action from past-participle stem of obstruere "build up, block, block up, build against, stop, bar, hinder," from ob "in front of, in the way of" (see ob-) + struere "to pile, build" (from PIE *streu-, extended form of root *stere- "to spread"). Figurative use is by 1650s.

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obstructionism (n.)

"the practice of systematic or persistent obstruction," especially in a legislative body, 1868, from obstruction + -ism.

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obstructionist (n.)

"one who advocates or practices obstructionism, one who factiously opposes and hinders the action of others," 1846, from obstruction + -ist.

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obstructive (adj.)

"having the quality of obstructing, serving or intended to hinder, delay, or annoy," 1610s, from Latin obstruct-, past-participle stem of obstruere "to build up, block, block up, build against, stop, bar, hinder" (see obstruction) + -ive.

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obtain (v.)

early 15c., obteinen, "to get or acquire, inherit, gain, conquer," from Old French obtenir "acquire, obtain" (14c.) and directly from Latin obtinere "hold, hold fast, take hold of, get possession of, acquire," from ob "in front of" (though perhaps intensive in this case; see ob-) + tenere "to hold," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." Intransitive sense of "be prevalent or customary, be established in practice" is from 1610s. Related: Obtained; obtaining.

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obtainable (adj.)

"procurable, that may be got," 1610s, from obtain + -able. Related: Obtainability.

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obtrude (v.)

1550s, "thrust forward forcibly or unduly" (trans.), from Latin obtrudere "to thrust into, press upon," from ob "in front of; toward" (see ob-) + trudere "to thrust," "to thrust, push," from PIE *treud- "to press, push, squeeze" (see threat). Intransitive sense of "be or become obtrusive, intrude, force oneself" is by 1570s. Related: Obtruded; obtruding.

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obtrusion (n.)

"an undue and unsolicited thrusting forward of something upon the notice or attention of others," 1570s, from Latin obtrusionem (nominative obtrusio), noun of action from past-participle stem of obtrudere "to thrust into, press upon" (see obtrude).

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obtrusive (adj.)

"given to thrusting one's self or one's opinions upon the company or notice of others, characterized by forcibly thrusting (oneself, etc.) into notice or prominence," 1660s, from Latin obtrus-, past participle stem of obtrudere (see obtrude) + -ive. Related: Obtrusively; obtrusiveness.

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