Etymology
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reprise (n.)

late 14c., "yearly deduction from charges upon a manor or estate," from Old French reprise "act of taking back" (13c.), fem. of repris, past participle of reprendre "take back," from Latin reprendere"pull back, hold back" (see reprehend). The meaning "resumption of an action" is attested from 1680s. The musical sense of "a repeated passage, act of repeating a passage" is by 1879.

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report (v.)

late 14c., "to make known, tell, relate," from Old French reporter "to tell, relate; bring back, carry away, hand over," from Latin reportare "carry back, bear back, bring back," figuratively "report," in Medieval Latin "write (an account) for information or record," from re- "back" (see re-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over"). Early 15c. as "to submit" (to an authority, etc.). Meaning "to name someone as having offended somehow" is from 1885.

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repercussion (n.)

early 15c., repercussioun, "act of driving back," from Old French répercussion (14c.) or directly from Latin repercusionem (nominative repercussio), noun of action from past-participle stem of repercutere "to strike or beat back; shine back, reflect; echo," from re- "back" (see re-) + percutere "to strike or thrust through" (see percussion).

Originally in medicine (Chauliac) with a specific sense of "act of driving back humors." Meaning "reverberation, echo" first recorded 1590s; the metaphoric extension is recorded from 1620s.

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hind (adj.)
c. 1300, "pertaining to the rear, back, posterior," perhaps a back-formation from Old English behindan "back, behind," used as adverb and preposition (see behind), or from or influenced by Old English hindan (adv.) "from behind," from Proto-Germanic *hind- "behind" (cognate with Gothic hindan (prep.) "on that side of, beyond, behind;" German hinten "behind"), of unknown origin. Possibly influenced by Middle English hiner (adv.) "back, rear."
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opisthography (n.)

"the practice of writing on the back of anything," 1715, from Greek opisthographos "written on the back," from graphos "writing" (from graphein"to write" (see -graphy) + opisthen "behind, from behind, at the back," from opi, a variant of epi "on it, at it" (see epi-). 

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anaphora (n.)

"repetition of a word or phrase in successive clauses," 1580s, from Latin, from Greek anaphora "reference," literally "a carrying back," from anapherein "to carry back, to bring up," from ana "back" (see ana-) + pherein "to bear" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry").

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repour (v.)

also re-pour, c. 1600, "pour back," from re- "back, again" + pour (v.). Related: Repoured; repouring.

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retransmit (v.)

"transmit further on or back again," 1868, from re- "back, again" + transmit (v.). Related: Retransmitted; retransmitting.

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resend (v.)

also re-send, "to send back or again," 1550s, from re- "back, again" + send (v.). Related: Resent; resending.

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