Etymology
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self-assertive (adj.)

"given to asserting one's opinions, rights, or claims; putting oneself forward presumptuously," 1853, from self- + assertive. Related: Self-assertively; self-assertiveness. Self-asserting is attested by 1802; self-assertion is by 1798.

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ascription (n.)

1590s, "action of adding in writing;" c. 1600, "attribution of authorship or origin," from Latin ascriptionem (nominative ascriptio) "an addition in writing," noun of action from past-participle stem of ascribere "to write in, add to in a writing; impute, attribute," from ad "to" (see ad-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

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aseity (n.)
"a being by itself, independent existence," 1690s, from Medieval Latin aseitas "state of being by itself," from Latin a "from" (see ab-) + se "oneself" (see suicide).
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Ashley 
fem. proper name, all but unknown before c. 1965; one of the most popular names for girls born in U.S. from c. 1980; evidently inspired by the surname Ashley, Ashleigh (attested from 12c.), which means "clearing among the ash trees," from Old English æsc (see ash (n.2)) + leah (see lea).
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ash-tray (n.)
also ashtray, "receptacle for smokers' ashes," 1851, from ash (n.1) + tray.
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asperse (v.)
late 15c., "to besprinkle," from Latin aspersus, past participle of aspergere "besprinkle, bespatter" (see aspersion). Meaning "to bespatter someone's character with rumor and false reports" is recorded from 1610s.
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asphyxiate (v.)

1818, "to suffocate" (someone or something), "produce asphyxia," from asphyxia in its transferred sense + -ate (2). Intransitive sense by 1882. Related: Asphyxiated; asphyxiating.

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asset (n.)
a 19c. artificial singular of assets (q.v.).
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association (n.)

1530s, "action of coming together for a common purpose," from Medieval Latin associationem (nominative associatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of associare "join with," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + sociare "unite with," from socius "companion, ally" (from PIE *sokw-yo-, suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow"). Meaning "an organized body of persons with a common purpose" is from 1650s. Meaning "mental connection" is from 1680s; that of "quality or thing called to mind by something else" is from 1810.

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assorted (adj.)
"consisting of selected kinds arranged in sorts," 1797, past-participle adjective from assort (v.).
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