Etymology
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sagittal (adj.)

1540s, "shaped like or resembling an arrow or arrowhead," as if from Latin *sagittalis, from sagitta "arrow" (see Sagittarius).

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Sagittarius (n.)

southern constellation; ninth sign of the zodiac, late Old English, from Latin, literally "archer," properly "pertaining to arrows," from sagitta "arrow," which probably is from a pre-Latin Mediterranean language.

Meaning "person born under Sagittarius" is attested from 1940 (properly Sagittarian, which is attested by 1911). The star-picture represents a centaur drawing a bow, scholars suspect it to have been originally a Babylonian god, but to modern observers it only looks vaguely like a teapot.

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sago (n.)

"starchy foodstuff made of the piths of palms," 1570s, via Portuguese and Dutch from Malay (Austronesian) sagu, the name of the palm tree from which it is obtained (attested in English in this sense from 1550s). Also borrowed in French (sagou), Spanish (sagu), German (Sago).

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saguaro (n.)

giant branching columnar species of cactus of the deserts of Arizona and Mexico, 1856, from Mexican Spanish, from a native name of unknown origin, perhaps from Yaqui (Sonoran).

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Sahara 

great desert of northern Africa, 1610s, from Arabic çahra "desert" (plural çahara), according to Klein, noun use of fem. of the adjective asharu "yellowish red." Related: Saharan.

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Sahel 

belt of mostly grassy land just below the Sahara in West Africa, from Arabic sahil "sea coast, shore." Originally in reference to the coastal region. Related: Sahelian.

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sahib (n.)

"gentleman, sir," respectful address to Europeans in India, 1670s, from Hindi or Urdu sahib "master, lord," from Arabic sahib, originally "friend, companion," from sahiba "he accompanied." Female form ("European lady") is memsahib.

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said (adj.)

"named or mentioned before," c. 1300, past-participle adjective from say (v.). Expression all is said and done is from 1550s.

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Saigon 
southern Vietnamese city, capital of former South Vietnam, named for its river, which bears a name of uncertain origin.
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sail (v.)

Old English segilan "travel on water in a ship by the action of wind upon sails; equip with a sail," from the same Germanic source as sail (n.); cognate with Old Norse sigla, Middle Dutch seghelen, Dutch zeilen, Middle Low German segelen, German segeln. Later extended to travel over water by steam power or other mechanical agency. The meaning "to set out on a sea voyage, leave port" is from c. 1200. Extended sense of "float through the air; move forward impressively" is by late 14c., as is the sense of "sail over or upon." Related: Sailed; sailing.

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