Etymology
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hovel (n.)

mid-14c., "roofed passage, vent for smoke," later "shed for animals" (mid-15c.), of unknown origin. The proposal that it is a diminutive of Old English hof "dwellings, farm" is "etymologically and chronologically inadmissible" [OED]. Meaning "shed for human habitation; rude or miserable cabin" is from 1620s. It also sometimes meant "canopied niche for a statue or image" (mid-15c.).

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creamer (n.)

1858, "dish for skimming cream from milk," agent noun from cream (v.). As "a pitcher or small jug for cream at the table," by 1877.

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chum (n.1)

"friend, intimate companion," 1680s, originally university slang for "roommate," an alternative spelling of cham, short for chamber(mate); the formation is typical of the late-17c. fondness for clipped words. Among derived forms used 19c. were chumship; chummery "shared bachelor quarters," chummage "system of quartering more than one to a room."

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bed-rest (n.)

by 1836 as "device for sitting up in bed;" by 1896 as "a resting in bed for recovery from injury or illness;" from bed (n.) + rest (n.).

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sizer (n.)

1670s, "device for measuring sizes, contrivance for sorting articles of various sizes," agent noun from size (v.). By 1863 as "person who measures or applies sizes."

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