Etymology
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expulsion (n.)

c. 1400, expulsioun, in medicine, "act of expelling matter from the body," from Old French expulsion or directly from Latin expulsionem (nominative expulsio), noun of action from past-participle stem of expellere "drive out" (see expel). From late 15c. as "forcible ejection, compulsory dismissal, banishment" as from a school or club.

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ablation (n.)

early 15c., "a carrying or taking away," in medicine, "mechanical removal of something harmful from the body," from Latin ablationem (nominative ablatio), "a taking away," noun of action from past-participle stem of auferre "to carry away," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + the irregular verb ferre (past participle latum; see oblate (n.)) "to bear, carry."

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mordacious (adj.)

"given to biting," 1640s (originally figurative, of words, speech, etc.), from Latin mordac-, stem of mordax "biting," from mordēre "to bite," which is perhaps from an extended form of PIE root *mer- "to rub away, harm." Middle English had mordicant (adj.) "corrosive, caustic" (in medicine), early 15c., also mordicative. Related: Mordacity (c. 1600).

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restrictive (adj.)

early 15c., restrictif, "serving to bind or draw together," specifically, in medicine (Chauliac) "staunching loss of blood, stringent, styptic," from Medieval Latin restrictivus, from Latin restrict-, past-participle stem of restringere "restrict, restrain" (see restriction). In reference to terms, etc., "imposing or implying restriction," 1570s. Related: Restrictively; restrictiveness.

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therapeutic (adj.)
pertaining to the healing of disease, 1640s, from Modern Latin therapeuticus "curing, healing," from Greek therapeutikos, from therapeutein "to cure, treat medically," primarily "do service, take care of, provide for," of unknown origin, related to therapon "attendant." Therapeutic was used from 1540s as a noun meaning "the branch of medicine concerned with treatment of disease." Related: Therapeutical (c. 1600).
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healer (n.)
late Old English, "one who heals," especially "savior, Jesus," agent noun from heal (v.). As "a curative medicine" from late 14c. The usual Old English noun for Jesus as savior was hæland (Middle English healend), a noun use of a present participle, being a rough translation of the name (see Joshua) or of Latin salvator.
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deplete (v.)

"empty, reduce, or exhaust by drawing away," 1807, originally in medicine (of blood-letting, purgatives), back-formation from depletion, which is from Latin deplere "to empty," literally "to un-fill," from de "off, away" (see de-) + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). General sense by 1859. Related: Depleted; depleting.

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inject (v.)
c. 1600, in medicine, from specialized sense of Latin iniectus "a casting on, a throwing over," past participle of inicere "to throw in or on; insert, bring into," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + -icere, combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Injectable; injected; injecting.
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humorous (adj.)

early 15c., in physiology and medicine, "relating to the body humors, characterized by an abundance of humors," a native formation from humor (n.), or else from Medieval Latin humorosus. In Shakespeare also "whimsical, full of fancies" (1580s); "ill-humored, peevish, moody" (c. 1600). The meaning "funny, exciting laughter" dates from 1705 in English. Related: Humorously; humorousness.

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reposition (n.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), reposicioun, in medicine, "a placing, putting, act of replacing, operation of restoring (something) to its original position," from Late Latin repositionem (nominative repositio) "a laying up, a storing up," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin reponere (see repose (v.2)). Meaning "act of laying up in safety" is from 1610s; that of "reinstatement" (of a person, to an office, etc.)
is from 1640s.

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