Etymology
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mediocrity (n.)

c. 1400, mediocrite, "moderation; intermediate state or amount," from Latin mediocritatem (nominative mediocritas) "a middle state, middling condition, medium," from mediocris "of middling height or state, moderate, ordinary," figuratively "mediocre, mean, inferior," literally "halfway up a mountain" (see mediocre). Neutral at first; disparaging sense "quality of being moderate or middling in ability, accomplishment, etc." began to predominate from late 16c. The meaning "person of mediocre abilities or attainments" is from 1690s. Before the tinge of disparagement crept in, another name for the Golden Mean was golden mediocrity.

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demigod (n.)

"inferior or minor deity, a being partly of divine nature," 1520s, from demi- + god, rendering Latin semideus. It can mean the offspring of a deity and a mortal, a man raised to divine rank, or a minor god. Related: Demigoddess.

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demo (n.)

"music recording given out for promotional purposes," by 1958 in Billboard magazine headlines and advertisements, short for demonstration disk. The word was used earlier to mean "a public political demonstration" (1936).

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tasty (adj.)
1610s, "having agreeable flavor, palatable," from taste (n.) + -y (2); in late 18c. it also could mean "tasteful, elegant" (from the secondary sense of taste (n.)). Related: Tastiness.
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furore (n.)
1790, Italian form of furor, borrowed into English originally in the sense "enthusiastic popular admiration;" it later descended to mean the same thing as furor and lost its usefulness.
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dobro (n.)
1952, American English, contracted from the name of its Slovakia-born inventors, the Dopera Brothers (John, Rudy, Emil). The word also happens to mean "good thing" in Slovak. Patent filed 1947, claims use from 1929.
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sick (v.)

"to chase, set upon" (as in command sick him!), 1845, a dialectal variant of seek. As it was an imperative to incite a dog to attack a person or animal, it came to mean "cause to pursue." Related: Sicked; sicking.

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meander (n.)

1570s, "confusion, intricacy" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin meander "a winding course," from Greek Maiandros, name of a river in Caria noted for its winding course (the Greeks used the name figuratively for winding patterns). In English in reference to river courses from 1590s. Sense of "a winding course, a winding or turning in a passage" is from 1630s. Adjectival forms that have been tried are meandrine (1846); meandrous (1650s); meandrian (c. 1600); meandry (1610s).

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meaningless (adj.)

"destitute of sense or significance," 1730, from meaning + -less. Related: Meaninglessly; meaninglessness.

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meaningly (adv.)

"in a meaning manner, significantly, with intention," mid-15c., from meaning + -ly (2).

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