Etymology
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No results were found for meal. Showing results for mean.
tasty (adj.)
1610s, "having agreeable flavor, palatable," from taste (n.) + -y (2); in late 18c. it also could mean "tasteful, elegant" (from the secondary sense of taste (n.)). Related: Tastiness.
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furore (n.)
1790, Italian form of furor, borrowed into English originally in the sense "enthusiastic popular admiration;" it later descended to mean the same thing as furor and lost its usefulness.
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meander (n.)

1570s, "confusion, intricacy" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin meander "a winding course," from Greek Maiandros, name of a river in Caria noted for its winding course (the Greeks used the name figuratively for winding patterns). In English in reference to river courses from 1590s. Sense of "a winding course, a winding or turning in a passage" is from 1630s. Adjectival forms that have been tried are meandrine (1846); meandrous (1650s); meandrian (c. 1600); meandry (1610s).

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meaningless (adj.)

"destitute of sense or significance," 1730, from meaning + -less. Related: Meaninglessly; meaninglessness.

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meaningly (adv.)

"in a meaning manner, significantly, with intention," mid-15c., from meaning + -ly (2).

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meaningful (adj.)

"full of meaning, significant," 1827, from meaning (n.) + -ful. Related: Meaningfully; meaningfulness.

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meander (v.)

"flow in a winding course" (of rivers), 1610s, from meander (n.). Of a person or persons, "to travel on a meandering river" (1821), then "to wander aimlessly" (1831), which was perhaps influenced by confusion with maunder [OED]. Related: Meandered; meandering.

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dobro (n.)
1952, American English, contracted from the name of its Slovakia-born inventors, the Dopera Brothers (John, Rudy, Emil). The word also happens to mean "good thing" in Slovak. Patent filed 1947, claims use from 1929.
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Malibu 

beach city northwest of Los Angeles, said to be from a native language, Chumash, and the name of one of their settlements nearby, Humaliwo, which is said to mean "where the surf sounds loudly." Modern development there dates from 1926.

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