Etymology
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hellish (adj.)
1520s, from hell + -ish. Related: Hellishly; hellishness. Earlier in same sense were helli "helly" (late 12c.); hellen "hellish, infernal" (c. 1200), with -en (2); and Old English hellic and hellcund.
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ticklish (adj.)

1580s, "easy to upset," 1580s, a figurative use, from tickle + -ish. The literal sense of "easily tickled" is from 1590s, as is the other figurative sense, "difficult to do, dubious, requiring great care." An earlier word was tickly (1520s). Related: Ticklishly; ticklishness.

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Salish (n.)

self-designation of the Native American people of Montana also known as Flathead, from a term containing -ish "people." The language group that includes their tongue has been called Salishan (1886).

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Swedish (adj.)
c. 1600, from Swede + -ish. Similar formation in Dutch Zweedsch, German Schwedisch. Related: Swedishness. As a language name from c. 1600. The candy Swedish fish attested by that name by 1983.
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feverish (adj.)
late 14c., "causing fever;" 1630s, "excited, unduly ardent;" 1640s, "having symptoms of fever, having a slight fever," from fever + -ish. Earlier in same sense was feverous (late 14c.). Old English had feferig, feferseoc. Related: Feverishly; feverishness.
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piggish (adj.)

1792, of persons, "like a pig" in disposition, habits, or manners, from pig (n.1) + -ish. Until 20c. usually "stubborn, selfish; unclean, coarse;" association with greedy eating is more recent. Related: Piggishly; piggishness.

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squeamish (adj.)

late 14c., variant (with -ish) of squoymous "disdainful, fastidious" (early 14c.), from Anglo-French escoymous, which is of unknown origin. Related: Squeamishly; squeamishness.

He was somdel squaymous
Of fartyng, and of speche daungerous
[Chaucer, "Miller's Tale," c. 1386]
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-esque 
word-forming element meaning "resembling or suggesting the style of," from French -esque "like, in the manner of," from Italian -esco, which, with Medieval Latin -iscus, is from Frankish or some other Germanic source (compare Old High German -isc, German -isch; see -ish).
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swinish (adj.)
c. 1200, originally of persons or behavior, "like a swine; gluttonous, sensual, degraded, beastly," from swine + -ish. Related: Swinishly; swinishness. Similar formation in German schweinisch. Old English had swinlic in same sense.
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garish (adj.)
"showy, dazzling," especially "glaringly vulgar and gaudy," 1540s, of unknown origin, possibly from obsolete Middle English gawren "to stare" (c. 1200), which is of uncertain origin (perhaps from Old Norse gaurr "rough fellow") + -ish. Related: Garishly; garishness.
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