Etymology
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fairyland (n.)
also fairy-land, 1580s, from fairy + land (n.). Earlier simply Faerie (c. 1300).
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fairy-tale (n.)
"oral narrative centered on magical tests, quests, and transformations," 1749, translating French Conte de feés, the name given to her collection by Madame d'Aulnois (1698, translated into English 1699). As an adjective (also fairytale), attested by 1963.
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fait accompli (n.)
"a scheme already carried into execution," 19c., French, literally "an accomplished fact." See feat and accomplish.
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faith (n.)
Origin and meaning of faith

mid-13c., faith, feith, fei, fai "faithfulness to a trust or promise; loyalty to a person; honesty, truthfulness," from Anglo-French and Old French feid, foi "faith, belief, trust, confidence; pledge" (11c.), from Latin fides "trust, faith, confidence, reliance, credence, belief," from root of fidere "to trust,"from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade." For sense evolution, see belief. Accommodated to other English abstract nouns in -th (truth, health, etc.).

From early 14c. as "assent of the mind to the truth of a statement for which there is incomplete evidence," especially "belief in religious matters" (matched with hope and charity). Since mid-14c. in reference to the Christian church or religion; from late 14c. in reference to any religious persuasion.

And faith is neither the submission of the reason, nor is it the acceptance, simply and absolutely upon testimony, of what reason cannot reach. Faith is: the being able to cleave to a power of goodness appealing to our higher and real self, not to our lower and apparent self. [Matthew Arnold, "Literature & Dogma," 1873]

From late 14c. as "confidence in a person or thing with reference to truthfulness or reliability," also "fidelity of one spouse to another." Also in Middle English "a sworn oath," hence its frequent use in Middle English oaths and asseverations (par ma fay, mid-13c.; bi my fay, c. 1300).

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faithful (adj.)

early 14c., "sincerely religious, devout, pious," especially in reference to Christian practice; mid-14c., "loyal (to a lord, friend, spouse, etc.); true; honest, trustworthy," from faith + -ful. From late 14c. in reference to a tale, a report, etc., "accurate, reliable, true to the facts." The noun sense of "true believer, one who is full of faith" is from late 14c. (Church Latin used fideles in same sense). Related: Faithfully; faithfulness. Old Faithful geyser named 1870 by explorer Gen. Henry Dana Washburn, surveyor-general of the Montana Territory, in reference to the regularity of its outbursts.

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faith-healer (n.)

Also faith healer, attested by 1874; from faith + healer. Faith-curer is from 1883.

The power which a man's imagination has over his body to heal it or make it sick is a force which none of us is born without. The first man had it, the last one will possess it. If left to himself, a man is most likely to use only the mischievous half of the force—the half which invents imaginary ailments for him and cultivates them; and if he is one of those very wise people, he is quite likely to scoff at the beneficent half of the force and deny its existence. ["Mark Twain," "Christian Science," 1907]
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faithless (adj.)

c. 1300, "unbelieving," from faith + -less. Meaning "insincere, deceptive" is mid-14c. Related: Faithlessly; faithlessness.

Unfaithful ... especially means a lack of fidelity to trust or duty, a failure to perform what is due, however much may be implied in that. Faithless is negative in form, but positive in sense; the faithless man does something which is a breach of faith; the sleeping sentinel is unfaithful; the deserter is faithless. [Century Dictionary, 1895]
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faitor (n.)
"impostor, cheat," mid-14c., from Anglo-French faiteor, faiture "evildoer; slothful person," apparently a specialized use of Old French faiture "sorcery, spell," literally "deed, action," from Latin facere "do, make, perform" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"), an etymologically neutral term taken in a bad sense.
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fajitas (n.)

traditional Tex-Mex dish consisting of strips of meat, chopped vegetables, and cheese wrapped in a tortilla, by 1977, from Mexican Spanish fajita, literally "little strip, little belt," a diminutive of Spanish faja "strip, belt, wrapper," from Latin fascia "band" (see fasces).

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