Etymology
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Dante 

masc. proper name, most modern uses outside Italy ultimately are in reference to Dante Alighieri (c. 1265-1321), the great poet; the name is a shortening of Latin Durante, from durare "to harden, endure," from durus "hard," from PIE *dru-ro-, suffixed variant form of root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast." Related: Dantean, Dantescan, Dantesque (the last from French).

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Danube 

major river of Europe flowing into the Black Sea (German Donau, Hungarian Duna, Russian Dunaj), from Latin Danuvius (Late Latin Danubius), from Celtic *danu(w)-yo-, from PIE *danu- "river" (compare Don, Dnieper, Dniester). Related: Danubian.

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Danzig 

German name of Polish Gdańsk,city on the Baltic coast of Poland, perhaps from Gdania, an older name for the river that runs through it, or from Gothic Gutisk-anja "end of the (territory of the) Goths." The spelling (attested from 13c.) in the German form of the name perhaps suggests a connection with Dane.

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Daoism (n.)

alternative Romanization of Taoism (q.v.).

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dap (n.)

fist-bump greeting, in African-American popular culture by 1972, with various theories as to origin and name meaning. Probably imitative (dap was used in 19c. for the bounce of a ball or the skip of a stone on water). Dap, meanwhile, is listed in the DAS as African-American vernacular c. 1950 for "aware, up to date," also "stylish, well-dressed," in the latter case at least a shortening of dapper. Controversial during the Vietnam War when used by U.S. soldiers, as it often was regarded by whites as a ritual act of black solidarity.

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Daphne 

fem. proper name, from Greek daphne "laurel, bay tree;" in mythology the name of a nymph, daughter of the river Peneus, metamorphosed into a laurel by Gaia to save her from being ravished as she was pursued by Apollo. The word probably is related to Latin laurus (see laurel).

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dapper (adj.)

mid-15c., "elegant, neat, trim," from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German dapper "bold, strong, sturdy," later "quick, nimble," from Proto-Germanic *dapraz (source also of Old High German tapfar "heavy," German tapfer "brave"), perhaps with ironical shift of meaning, from PIE root *dheb- "dense, firm, compressed."

Later shifting toward "small and active, nimble, brisk, lively" (from c. 1600). "Formerly appreciative; now more or less depreciative, with associations of littleness or pettyness" [OED].

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dappled (adj.)

"spotted, marked with roundish spots of different colors or shades," early 15c., probably from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse depill "spot," Norwegian dape "puddle, splash of water." Or perhaps a back-formation from, or merger with, Middle English adjective dapple-gray "apple-gray" (late 14c.), used first of a horse, based on resemblance to the markings on an apple (compare Old Norse apalgrar "dapple-gray").

Dapple (adj.) "marked with spots, having spots of different colors or shades" (1550s), dapple (n.) "a spot, one of a number of various spots" (1570s), and dapple (v.) "to mark with various roundish spots of different colors or shades" (1590s) seem too late to be the source, but the relationship of all of them is uncertain.

Also, for origin of the sense, compare Middle English shimed (mid-15c.), of a horse, "dappled, dapple-gray," etymologically "shadowed," related to Old English scima "shade, glimmer."

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dar 

Arabic word, literally "house," used in place names, such as Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, literally "House of Peace," Darfur, etc.

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D.A.R. 

initialism for Daughters of the American Revolution, a non-profit patriotic service organization founded in 1890 for women directly descended from someone involved in the war of independence by the American colonies of Great Britain.

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