Etymology
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analepsis (n.)
"recovery of strength after a disease," 1849, from Greek analepsis "a recovery," from analambanein "to restore, repair," literally "take up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + lambanein "to take" (see lemma).
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involute (adj.)
early 15c., "wrapped," from Latin involutus "rolled up, intricate, obscure," past participle of involvere "envelop, surround; roll into, wrap up" (see involve).
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upkeep (n.)
"maintenance; cost of maintenance," 1849, from verbal phrase keep up "maintain in good order or condition" (1660s); see up (adv.) + keep (v.).
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completive (adj.)

"completing or tending to complete," 1670s, from Late Latin completivus "serving to fill up," from past-participle stem of complere "to fill up" (see complete (adj.)).

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doll (v.)

1867, in dialect, "to pet, indulge" (a child), from doll (n.). Usually with up. Meaning "to dress (up)" is by 1906, American English. Related: Dolled; dolling.

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kilt (n.)
"plaited tartan skirt," originally the part of the belted plaid which hung below the waist, c. 1730, quelt, from Middle English verb kilten "to tuck up" (mid-14c.), from a Scandinavian source (compare Danish kilte op "to tuck up;" Old Norse kilting "shirt," kjalta "fold made by gathering up to the knees").
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sum (v.)
early 14c., "to count, count up, calculate, reckon," from Old French sommer "to count, add up," or directly from Medieval Latin summare, from summa (see sum (n.)). Meaning "briefly state the substance of" is first recorded 1620s (since c. 1700 usually with up). Related: Summed; summing.
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