Etymology
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mobilization (n.)

1799, "a rendering movable," from French mobilisation, from mobiliser (see mobilize). Military sense of "act of putting in readiness for service" is from 1866. Sociological sense of "organizing of latent social energy to bring about change in society" is by 1953.

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introductory (adj.)
c. 1600, from Late Latin introductorius, from introduct-, past participle stem of Latin introducere "to lead in, bring in" (see introduction). Also used in English from c. 1400 as a noun meaning "introductory treatise or textbook."
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wheal (n.)
"mark made on the skin by a whip," 1808, perhaps an alteration of wale, possibly by confusion with weal "welt," and obsolete wheal "pimple, pustule" (mid-15c.), from Old English verb hwelian "to form pus, bring to a head."
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multiparous (adj.)

"bringing forth many young at a birth," 1640s, from Modern Latin multiparus "giving or having given birth to many," from multi- "many" + stem of parire "to bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Related: Multiparity.

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photic (adj.)

1843, "pertaining to light;" 1899, "pertaining to the parts of the ocean penetrated by sunlight," from Greek phot-, combining form of phōs "light" (related to phainein "to show, to bring to light," from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine") + -ic. Photics "the science of light" is attested by 1858.

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litter (v.)
late 14c., "provide with bedding," from litter (n.). Meaning "bring forth, give birth to" (of animals or, contemptuously, of humans) is from late 15c. Meaning "to strew with objects" is from 1713. Transitive sense of "to scatter in a disorderly way" is from 1731. Related: Littered; littering.
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transfer (v.)

late 14c., from Old French transferer or directly from Latin transferre "bear across, carry over, bring through; transfer, copy, translate," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ferre "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). Related: Transferred; transferring.

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upbraid (v.)
Old English upbregdan "bring forth as a ground for censure," from up (adv.) + bregdan "move quickly, intertwine" (see braid (v.)). Similar formation in Middle Swedish upbrygdha. Meaning "scold" is first attested late 13c. Related: Upbraided; upbraiding.
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concord (v.)

late 14c., "reconcile, bring into harmony" (transitive); c. 1400, "agree, cooperate," from Old French concorder and directly from Latin concordare "be of one mind," from concors "of the same mind" (see concord (n.)). Related: Concorded; concording.

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atone (v.)

1590s, "be in harmony, agree, be in accordance," from adverbial phrase atonen (c. 1300) "in accord," literally "at one," a contraction of at and one. It retains the older pronunciation of one.

The meaning "make up (for errors or deficiencies)" is from 1660s; that of "make reparations" is from 1680s.

Atone. To bring at one, to reconcile, and thence to suffer the pains of whatever sacrifice is necessary to bring about a reconciliation. [Hensleigh Wedgwood, "A Dictionary of English Etymology," 1859]

The phrase perhaps is modeled on Latin adunare "unite," from ad "to, at" (see ad-) + unum "one." Related: Atoned; atoning.

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