Etymology
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oxidize (v.)

1802 "cause to combine with oxygen" (implied in oxidizable); by 1803 in the intransitive sense of "combine with oxygen;" from oxide + -ize. Related: Oxidized; oxidizing; oxidization.

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oxidizer (n.)

"that which oxidizes," 1875, agent noun from oxidize.

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oxo- 

word-forming element denoting the presence of a carbonyl group or an oxygen atom linking two other atoms; from oxygen.

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Oxo 

trade name of a brand of beef extract, 1899, British, from ox.

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Oxonian (adj.)

"pertaining to Oxford or to Oxford University," 1640s, from Medieval Latin oxonia, Latinized form of Middle English Oxforde (see Oxford). Earlier as a noun, "native or inhabitant of Oxford" (1540s).

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oxtail (n.)

"the tail of an ox, prepared as food," Old English oxan tægl; see ox + tail (n.1).

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ox-tongue (n.)

also oxtongue, "plant of the borage family with rough, tongue-shaped leaves," early 14c., oxe-tunge, from ox + tongue (n.).

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oxy- 
word-forming element meaning "sharp, pointed; acid," from Greek oxys "sharp, pungent" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce" ). Also used as a combining form of oxygen.
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oxycodone (n.)
from (hydr)oxy(l) + codeine. Developed 1916 in Germany; introduced in U.S. 1939.
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OxyContin 
brand name of an oxycodone compound marketed in U.S. from 1996. Second element from continuous (i.e. "time-released").
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