Etymology
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ironstone (n.)
1520s, from iron (n.) + stone (n.). As a type of hard, white pottery, 1825.
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underdone (adj.)
1680s, in reference to cooked meat, from under + done. Old English underdon (v.), Middle English underdo meant "to put under, to subject, subjugate."
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carpaccio (n.)

"raw meat or fish served as an appetizer," 1975, from Italian, often connected to the name of Renaissance painter Vittore Carpaccio (c. 1460-1526) but without any plausible explanation except perhaps that his pictures often feature an orange-red hue reminiscent of some raw meat (and were the subject of a popular exhibit in Venice in 1963).

Giuseppe Cipriani, the owner of Harry's Bar [in Venice], claimed to have first served it around 1950 for a customer who demanded raw meat, but its name is not recorded in print before 1969 .... Over the decades the term has broadened out to cover any raw ingredient, including fish and even fruit, sliced thinly. [Ayto, "Diner's Dictionary"]
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litharge (n.)

"mineral form of lead monoxide" (used to make red pigments), early 14c., from Old French litarge, from Latin lithargyrus, from Greek lithargyros, from lithos "stone" (see litho-) + argyros "silver" (from PIE root *arg- "to shine; white," hence "silver" as the shining or white metal).

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bouillon (n.)
broth or soup from boiled beef or other meat, 1650s, from French bouillon (11c.), noun use of past participle of bouillir "to boil," from Old French bolir (see boil (v.)).
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carving (n.)
c. 1200, "the action of cutting," verbal noun from carve. From late 14c. as "action of carving meat at the table," also "carved work, something carved." Carving-knife is from early 15c.
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contrail (n.)

"white line of ice crystals behind an airplane in motion," 1945, from condensation trail (1942); see condensation.

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terr (n.)
Rhodesian slang abbreviation of terrorist, 1976, used in reference to guerrilla fighting against white minority government.
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whitewash (v.)
1590s, "to wash a building surface with white liquid," from white (adj.) + wash (v.). Figurative sense of "to cover up, conceal, give a false appearance of cleanness to" is attested from 1762. Related: Whitewashed; whitewashing. The noun is recorded from 1690s; in the figurative sense from 1851. The earlier verb was whitelime (c. 1300).
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pickle (n.)

c. 1400, "spiced sauce served with meat or fowl" (early 14c. as a surname), probably from Middle Dutch pekel "pickle, brine," or related words in Low German and East Frisian (Dutch pekel, East Frisian päkel, German pökel), which are of uncertain origin or original meaning. Klein suggests the name of a medieval Dutch fisherman who developed the process.

The meaning "cucumber preserved in pickle" first recorded 1707, via use of the word for the salty liquid in which meat, etc. was preserved (c. 1500). Colloquial figurative sense of "a sorry plight, a state or condition of difficulty or disorder" is recorded by 1560s, from the time when the word still meant a sauce served on meat about to be eaten. Meaning "troublesome boy" is from 1788, perhaps from the notion of being "imbued" with roguery.

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