Etymology
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whisker (n.)

"hair of a man's face" (usually plural), c. 1600, originally a playful formation, from Middle English wisker "anything that whisks or sweeps" (early 15c.), agent noun from whisk (v.). In reference to animal lip hair, recorded from 1670s. Related: Whiskered; whiskers.

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cork (v.)

1570s, "to put a cork sole on a shoe," from cork (n.)). Meaning "to stop with a cork" is from 1640s. Figurative sense "to stop or check" is from 1640s. Meaning "blacken with burnt cork," especially the face, to perform in theatrical blackface, is from 1836. Related: Corked; corking.

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sidecar (n.)

also side-car, 1881, "conveyance in which the seats face to the side;" see side (n.) + car (n.). Attested by 1903 as "vehicle designed to be attached to the side of a motorcycle to accommodate another passenger." By 1928 as the name of a cocktail.

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make-up (n.)

also makeup, "manner in which something is put together," 1821, from the verbal phrase (see make (v.) + up (adv.)). To make up "build, collect into one form by bringing together" is from late 14c., also "prepare." It is attested from late 15c. as "supply as an equivalent," from 1660s as "end a quarrel, reconcile, settle differences, become friends again," by 1825 as "to fabricate artfully" (a story, etc.).

In reference to an actor, "prepare for impersonating a role" (including dress and the painting of the face), by 1808. Hence the noun sense of "appearance of the face and dress" (1858) and the sense of "cosmetics," attested by 1886, originally of actors.

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prone (adj.)

c. 1400, "naturally inclined (to have or do something), apt, liable by disposition or tendency," from Latin pronus "bent forward, leaning forward, bent over," figuratively "inclined to, disposed," perhaps from adverbial form of pro "before, for, instead of" (see pro-) + ending as in infernus, externus.

The meaning "bending forward with the face down" is from 1570s; according to OED, the broader sense of "lying flat, in a horizontal position" (1690s) is "Permissible of things that have not an upper and under side, but improper of men and animals, unless the position is as in I" ["situated or lying face downward"]. Related: Proneness.

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triceratops (n.)

dinosaur genus, 1890, from Greek trikeratos "three-horned" + ōps "face," etymologically "eye," from PIE root *okw- "to see." The first element is from tri- "three" (see three) + keras (genitive keratos) "horn of an animal," from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head."

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redden (v.)

1610s, "make read;" 1640s, "become red" (especially of the face, with shame, etc.), from red (adj.1) + -en (1). The older verb form is Middle English reden, Old English readian, reodian "become red;" see red (v.). Related: Reddened; reddening.

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portrait (n.)

1560s, "a figure, drawn or painted," a back formation from portraiture or directly from French portrait, from Old French portret (13c.), noun use of past participle of portraire "to paint, depict" (see portray). Especially a picture or representation of the head and face of a person drawn from life. Related: Portraitist.

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rivet (v.)

early 15c., riveten, "to fasten (something) with rivets," also "to fasten (a nail or bolt) by hammering down the rivet," from rivet (n.). Figurative meaning "to command the attention" is from c. 1600 (For I mine eyes will rivet to his Face - "Hamlet"). Related: Riveted; riveting.

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stubble (n.)

c. 1300, "stumps of grain stalks left in the ground after reaping," from Old French estuble "stubble" (Modern French éteule), from Vulgar Latin *stupla, reduced form of Latin stipula "stalk, straw" (see stipule). Applied from 1590s to bristles on a man's unshaven face.

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