Etymology
Advertisement
Dartmouth 

town in Devon, England, named for its situation at the mouth of the Dart River, which is perhaps from a Celtic word for "oak."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
karat (n.)

1854, spelling variant of carat (q.v.). In U.S., karat is used for "proportion of fine gold in an alloy" and carat for "measure of weight of a precious stone."

Related entries & more 
apiece (adv.)

"for each" (thing, person, etc.), 1550s, a contraction of a pece (mid-15c.), originally of coins, objects for sale, etc.; see a (2) + piece (n.1).

Related entries & more 
deke (n.)

1960, ice hockey slang for a quick feinting move meant to induce an opponent out of position, short for decoy. The verb is attested from 1961. Related: Deked.

Related entries & more 
disown (v.)
1620s; see dis- + own (v.) in the sense "be responsible for, have legal authority over (and thus legal liability for)." Related: Disowned; disowning.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
g spot (n.)
also g-spot, 1981, short for Gräfenberg spot, named for German gynecologist Ernst Gräfenberg (1881-1957), who described it in 1950.
Related entries & more 
a deux 
French, à deux, literally "for two," from à, from Latin ad "to, toward; for" (see ad-) + deux (see deuce). By 1876 as a French term in English.
Related entries & more 
Johnny 
pet form of masc. proper name John, with -y (3). Used as a contemptuous or humorous designation for some class or group of men from 1670s.

It was the typical name in the North and the Northern armies for a Confederate soldier during the American Civil War, and the Southern soldiers were, collectively Johnnies, generically Johnny Reb. In the Mediterranean, it was a typical name for an Englishman by c. 1800. In the Crimean War it became the typical name among the English for "a Turk" (also Johnny Turk), later it was extended to Arabs; by World War II the Arabs were using Johnny as the typical name for "a British man"). Johnny Crapaud as a derogatory generic name for a Frenchman or France is from 1818.

Johnny-come-lately "a new arrival" first attested 1839. Johnny-on-the-spot is from 1896. Johnny-jump-up as an American English name for the pansy is from 1837. Johnny-cocks, a colloquial name for the early purple orchid (Orchis mascula) is attested from 1883.
Related entries & more 
knickers (n.)
1866, in reference to loose-fitting pants for men worn buckled or buttoned at the waist and knees, shortening of knickerbockers (1859), said to be so called for their resemblance to the trousers of old-time Dutchmen in Cruikshank's illustrations for Washington Irving's "History of New York" (see Knickerbocker). As "short, loose-fitting undergarment for women," by 1882, now the usual sense.
Related entries & more 

Page 11