Etymology
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chimichanga (n.)

"deep-fried burrito," by 1964; the thing and the name for it seem to have originated somewhere along the western U.S.-Mexico border (Arizona, Sonora). The name is said to mean "trinket" in Mexican Spanish.

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Lenape 

1728, from the Unami Delaware (Algonquian) native designation, said to mean literally "original person," from /len-/ "ordinary, real, original" + /-a:p:e/ "person." Sometimes in extended form Lenni Lenape, with /leni-/ "real."

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courthouse (n.)

also court-house, "building in which courts of law are held," late 15c., from court (n.) + house (n.). In Virginia and the Upper South, it also can mean "county seat."

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isotherm (n.)

"line connecting points on the earth having the same mean temperature," 1850, from French isotherme (von Humboldt, 1817), from Greek isos "equal, identical" (see iso-) + therme "heat" (see thermal (adj.)).

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chintzy (adj.)

1851, from chintz + -y (2). "decorated or covered with chintz," especially in a derogatory extended sense "suburban, unfashionable, petit-bourgeois, cheap; mean, stingy" [OED].

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Shannon 

river in Ireland, the name is said to mean something like "old man river," from a Proto-Celtic word related to Irish sean "old" (from PIE root *sen- "old").

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Hawaii 

from Hawaiian Hawai'i, from Proto-Polynesian *hawaiki. Said to mean "Place of the Gods" and be a reference to Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. See also sandwich. Related: Hawaiian (1825). First record of Hawaiian shirt is from 1943.

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faux (adj.)

from French faux "false" (12c., see false). Used with English words at least since 1676 (Etheredge, faux-prude). Used by itself, with French pronunciation, from 1980s to mean "fake."

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demigod (n.)

"inferior or minor deity, a being partly of divine nature," 1520s, from demi- + god, rendering Latin semideus. It can mean the offspring of a deity and a mortal, a man raised to divine rank, or a minor god. Related: Demigoddess.

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dobro (n.)

1952, American English, contracted from the name of its Slovakia-born inventors, the Dopera Brothers (John, Rudy, Emil). The word also happens to mean "good thing" in Slovak. Patent filed 1947, claims use from 1929.

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