Etymology
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condescendence (n.)

1630s, "act of condescending," from French condescendance, from condescendre"to consent, give in, yield," from Latin condescendere  "to let oneself down" (see condescend). Related: Condescendency.

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butterfingers (n.)
also butter-fingers, "person apt to let things fall," 1837; see butter-fingered.
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droplet (n.)

"a little drop," c. 1600, from drop (n.) + diminutive suffix -let.

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pretermit (v.)

1510s, "neglect to do, leave undone," from Latin praetermittere "let pass, overlook," from praeter- (see preter-) + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission). From 1530s as "intentionally omit, leave unnoticed or unmentioned." Related: Pretermitted; pretermitting.

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driblet (n.)

also dribblet, "small piece or part, an inconsiderable part of a whole," 1590s, diminutive of drib (n.) with -let.

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lethal (adj.)
"causing or resulting in death," 1580s, from Late Latin lethalis, alteration of Latin letalis "deadly, fatal," from lethum/letum "death," a word of uncertain origin. According to de Vaan, from Proto-Italic *leto-, which is perhaps a noun from a PIE past participle of a verb meaning "let, let go," on the notion of death as "a letting go." If so, related to Old Church Slavonic leto "summer, year" (from notion of "going"), Russian leto "summer," (pl.) "age, years;" Russian let' (archaic) "it is possible, allowed;" Old Norse lað, Old English læð "land," Gothic unleds "poor." The form altered in Late Latin by association with lethes hydor "water of oblivion" in Hades in Greek mythology, from Greek lethe "forgetfulness" (see Lethe).
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spoil-sport (n.)

1786, from verbal phrase (attested by 1711) in reference to one who "ruins" the "fun;" see spoil (v.) + sport (n.). Compare Chaucer's letgame "hinderer of pleasure" (late 14c.), from obsolete verb let (Middle English letten) "hinder, prevent, stop" (see let (n.)). Another old word for it was addle-plot "person who spoils any amusement" (1690s; see addle).

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leet (n.1)
in reference to special court proceedings, late 13c., from Anglo-French lete, Anglo-Latin leta, of unknown origin; OED suggests possible connection to let (v.).
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admission (n.)
Origin and meaning of admission

early 15c., "acceptance, reception, approval," from Latin admissionem (nominative admissio) "a letting in," noun of action from past-participle stem of admittere "admit, give entrance; grant an audience," of acts, "let be done, allow, permit," from ad "to" (see ad-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Meaning "an acknowledging" is from 1530s. Literal sense of "act of allowing to enter, admittance," is from 1620s. As short for admission price, by 1792.

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drawbridge (n.)

also draw-bridge, "bridge which may be drawn up or let down," c. 1300, drawebrigge, from draw (v.) + bridge (n.).

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