Etymology
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furore (n.)
1790, Italian form of furor, borrowed into English originally in the sense "enthusiastic popular admiration;" it later descended to mean the same thing as furor and lost its usefulness.
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coast guard (n.)

also coast-guard, 1827, a guard stationed on a coast, originally to prevent smuggling, later serving as a general police force for the coast; see coast (n.) + guard (n.).

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Peru 

ancient realm in northwestern South America, later a Spanish viceroyalty, since 1821 an independent republic, from Spanish Peru, said to be from Quechua (Inca) pelu "river." Related: Peruvian.

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complacency (n.)

"fact or state of being pleased with something or someone, especially oneself," 1640s, from same source as complacence but with the later form of the suffix (see -cy).

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coronal (adj.)

1540s, "pertaining to a crown" (or, later, to one of the extended senses of Latin corona), from French coronal (16c.), from Latin coronalis "of or pertaining to a crown," from corona "a crown" (see crown (n.)).

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bibliolator (n.)
also bibliolater, "book-worshipper," 1820, perhaps first in Coleridge, from bibliolatry (q.v.). In later use, especially "one who regards the letter of the Bible with undue respect."
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flap (v.)
early 14c., "dash about, shake, beat (the wings);" later "strike, hit" (mid-14c.); probably ultimately imitative. Meaning "to swing about loosely" is from 1520s. Related: Flapped; flapping.
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radiology (n.)
1900, "medical use of X-rays," later extended to "scientific study of radiation," from radio-, combining form of radiation, + Greek-based scientific suffix -ology. Related: Radiological.
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Shenandoah 
originally a place name in Dutchess County, N.Y., from Oneida (Iroquoian) family name Skenondoah, derived from oskenon:to "deer." Later transferred to river and valley in Virginia.
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black box (n.)
1947, RAF slang for "navigational instruments;" later extended to any sort of apparatus that operates in a sealed container. Especially of flight recorders from c. 1964.
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