Etymology
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Moorish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the Moors," mid-15c., moreis, morys, morreys, from Moor + -ish. Earlier was Moreske (mid-14c.), from Old French moresque, morisque. Also compare Morisco, Moresco.

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elfish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to elves or to elf-land, of the nature of or resembling an elf, caused by or characteristic of elves," c. 1200, alvisc; see elf + -ish. Compare elvish. Related: Elfishly; elfishness.

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bookish (adj.)
1560s, "given to reading, fond of books," from book (n.) + -ish. From 1590s in the sense of "overly studious, acquainted with books only." Related: Bookishly; bookishness.
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buckish (adj.)
"dandyish," 1782, from buck (n.1) in the slang sense + -ish. Earlier it meant "like a he-goat, foul-smelling, lascivious" (1510s). Related: Buckishly; buckishness.
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clownish (adj.)

1560s, "rustic;" 1580s, "boorish, ungainly, awkward," from clown (n.) + -ish. Meaning "pertaining to or characteristic of a (stage) clown" is perhaps from c. 1600. Related: Clownishly; clownishness.

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inlandish (adj.)
1650s, "produced at home, domestic, native," from inland in the "domestic, not foreign" sense + -ish. Also "characteristic of inland regions" (1849). Old English had inlendisc, inlende "native, indigenous."
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thievish (adj.)
mid-15c., "of or pertaining to thieves," from thieve or thief + -ish. Meaning "inclined to steal" is from 1530s. Wyclif and Chaucer used thiefly (late 14c.). Related: Thievishly; thievishness.
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beamish (adj.)

1530 (beamysshe, in John Palsgrave's "L'éclaircissement de la langue française"), from beam + -ish. Lewis Carroll may have thought he was inventing it in "Jabberwocky" (1871).

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Polish (adj.)

"of or pertaining to Poland or its natives or inhabitants," 1670s, from Pole + -ish. Related: Polishness. Polish-American is attested by 1883 in the Chicago newspapers. An earlier adjective was Polonian (1580s), from the Latin form of the name.

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modish (adj.)

"fashionable, stylish," often with a hint of contempt, 1650s, from mode (n.2) + -ish. "Very common in 17-18 c.; now somewhat arch[aic]." [OED]. Related: Modishly; modishness.

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