Etymology
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Elijah 

name of the great Old Testament prophet, from Hebrew Elijjah, literally "the Lord is God." The Greek form is Elias.

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invocation (n.)

late 14c., "petition (to God or a god) for aid or comfort; invocation, prayer;" also "a summoning of evil spirits," from Old French invocacion "appeal, invocation" (12c.), from Latin invocationem (nominative invocatio), noun of action from past participle stem of invocare "to call upon, invoke, appeal to" (see invoke).

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serving (n.)

c. 1200, "action of serving," originally in reference to performing rites or worshipping (God or a pagan god), verbal noun from serve (v.). As "a helping of food" from 1769; earlier "the manner of carving at table" (c. 1400). Serving-board "table for serving food" is from mid-15c.

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Quetzalcoatl (n.)

plumed serpent god of the Toltecs and Aztecs, 1570s, Quecalcouatl, from Nahuatl (Aztecan)  quetzalli (see quetzal) + coatl "snake."

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Nobodaddy (n.)

c. 1793, William Blake's derisive name for the anthropomorphic God of Christianity. The name reflects nobody + daddy.

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Hephaestus 

Greek god of fire and metal-working, from Latinized form of Greek Hēphaistos, a pre-Greek word of unknown origin.

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punisher (n.)

"one who punishes," mid-14c., of God, as exactor of divine retribution, agent noun from punish (v.).

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Aesir 

collective name for the chief gods of the pagan Scandinavian religion, from Old Norse plural of āss "god," from Proto-Germanic *ansu- (source also of Old High German ansi, Old English os, Gothic ans "god"), from PIE root *ansu- "spirit" (source also of first element in Ahura Mazda (q.v.)).

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*dyeu- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god."

It forms all or part of: adieu; adios; adjourn; Asmodeus; circadian; deific; deify; deism; deity; deodand; deus ex machina; deva; dial; diary; Diana; Dianthus; diet (n.2) "assembly;" Dioscuri; Dis; dismal; diurnal; diva; Dives; divine; joss; journal; journalist; journey; Jove; jovial; Julia; Julius; July; Jupiter; meridian; Midi; per diem; psychedelic; quotidian; sojourn; Tuesday; Zeus.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit deva "god" (literally "shining one"); diva "by day;" Avestan dava- "spirit, demon;" Greek delos "clear;" Latin dies "day," deus "god;" Welsh diw, Breton deiz "day;" Armenian tiw "day;" Lithuanian dievas "god," diena "day;" Old Church Slavonic dini, Polish dzień, Russian den "day;" Old Norse tivar "gods;" Old English Tig, genitive Tiwes, name of a god.

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infralapsarian (adj.)

1731, from infra- + Latin lapsus "a fall" (see lapse (n.)) + ending from unitarian, etc.

[In theology], the doctrine held by Augustinians and by many Calvinists, that God planned the creation, permitted the fall, elected a chosen number, planned their redemption, and suffered the remainder to be eternally punished. The Sublapsarians believe that God did not permit but foresaw the fall, while the Supralapsarians hold that God not only permitted but decreed it. [Century Dictionary]
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