Etymology
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Carol 
masc. proper name, from Medieval Latin Carolus, which is of Germanic origin, from the common noun meaning "man, husband" (see carl). As a fem. proper name, an abbreviation of Caroline. The masc. name never has been popular in U.S.; the fem. form was common after c. 1900 and was a top-10 name for U.S. girls born 1936-1950.
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vulgarity (n.)

1570s, "the common people," from French vulgarité and directly from Late Latin vulgaritas "the multitude," from vulgaris (see vulgar). Meaning "coarseness, crudeness" is recorded from 1774.

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ring-dove (n.)

"wood-pigeon," a common European bird, 1530s, from ring (n.1) + dove (v.). It has a ring-shaped marking around the neck.

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sware 
obsolete or archaic past tense of swear (v.), common 15c.-17c. by analogy of past tense of bear (v.).
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sandpiper (n.)

common name of a small wading bird that runs along the sand and utters a piping note, 1670s, from sand (n.) + piper.

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aforesaid (adj.)
"mentioned before in a preceding part of the same writing or speech," a common legal word, late 14c., from afore + said.
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commensurable (adj.)

"having a common measure" (as a yard and a foot, both of which may be measured by inches), 1550s, from Late Latin commensurabilis "having a common measure," from com "together, with" (see com-) + Latin mensurabilis "that can be measured," from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."

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cornflower (n.)

"any flower or plant growing in grain fields" (typically the common bluebottle), 1570s, from corn (n.1) + flower (n.).

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table-d'hote (n.)
"common table for guests at a hotel," French, table-d'hôte, literally "table of the host;" see table (n.) + host (n.).
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praise (n.)

"expression of approbation or esteem because of some virtue, performance, or quality," early 14c., from praise (v.). Not common until 16c.; the earlier noun, and the common one through most of the Middle English period, was praising (c. 1200).

Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer,
And without sneering, teach the rest to sneer;
[Pope, "Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot"]
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