Etymology
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pent (adj.)
"kept in, confined," 1540s, variant of penned, past participle of pen (v.2). Pent-up (also pent up) is from 1580s.
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occlude (v.)

"to shut up or stop up so as to prevent anything from passing through," 1590s, from Latin occludere (past participle occlusus) "shut up, close up," from assimilated form of ob "in front of, against" (see ob-) + claudere "to shut, close" (see close (v.)). Of teeth, "come in contact with another tooth," 1888. Related: Occluded; occluding.

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layup (n.)
also lay-up, 1927, "temporary period out of work," from the verbal phrase; see lay (v.) + up (adv.). Compare layoff. Basketball shot so called by 1955, short for lay-up shot (1947). The verbal phrase is attested from mid-14c. as "store away," 1550s as "confine to one's bed or room" (of illness); of ships in docks, 1660s. Related: Laid-up.
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resume (n.)

also résumé, 1804, "a summary, summing up, recapitulation," from French résumé, noun use of past participle of resumer "to sum up," from Latin resumere "take again, take up again" (see resume (v.)). Meaning "biographical summary of a person's career" is 1940s.

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sustain (v.)
c. 1300, "give support to," from stem of Old French sostenir "hold up, bear; suffer, endure" (13c.), from Latin sustinere "hold up, hold upright; furnish with means of support; bear, undergo, endure," from assimilated form of sub "up from below" (see sub-) + tenere "to hold," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." Meaning "continue, keep up" (an action, etc.) is from early 14c. Sense of "endure without failing or yielding" is from c. 1400. Related: Sustained; sustaining.
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anagogical (adj.)
"having a secondary, spiritual sense" (of Scripture, etc.), 1520s, with -ical + Greek anagoge "elevation; spiritual or mystical enlightenment," from anagein "to lead up, lift up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + agein "to lead, put in motion," from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move."
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all-nighter (n.)

"incident of staying up all night," 1870, from the adverbial phrase; see all + night. By 1930 as "person who stays up all night."

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intussusception (n.)
"reception of one part within another," 1707, literally "a taking in," from Latin intus "within" (see ento-) + susceptionem (nominative susceptio) "a taking up, a taking in hand, undertaking," noun of action from past participle stem of suscipere "to take, catch, take up, lift up" (see susceptible).
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surrender (v.)
mid-15c., "to give (something) up," from Old French surrendre "give up, deliver over" (13c.), from sur- "over" (see sur- (1)) + rendre "give back" (see render (v.)). Reflexive sense of "to give oneself up" (especially as a prisoner) is from 1580s. Related: Surrendered; surrendering.
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